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Sunday 31 August 2014

Elderly's online woes

Published 25/10/2013 | 02:00

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OLDER people face significant barriers in accessing government and public sector online services, a new report has found.

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The report, to be launched today by the Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland, reveals an emerging "digital disconnect" between IT-literate younger people and late-adopting older people. It found that only 7pc of those over 65 years of age were using government online services, despite the Government moving more of its key services online.

BARNARDOS LOSES CASH

LOSSES continued to mount last year at children's charity, Barnardos in spite of the charity taking drastic measures to stem the losses.

The charity's annual statements for 2012 show that it recorded a loss of €1.339m last year, further eating into the organisation's cash reserves. The financial challenges facing the organisation forced it to shut down its service for one week in August of last year – a move repeated this year.

LIFE-CHANGING PLEDGE

A BELGIAN donor has pledged €8,000 for the provision of a new EEG ambulatory machine after reading a story about the plight of a Clare toddler Brianna Lynch, whose seizures are detected by her family's Great Dane, Charlie.

Money is coming in through the Great Dane Society, which is being lodged to the Elaine Kirby and Mary Graydon Charity Account in Bank of Ireland for the machine.

DORMANT HIV DANGER

DORMANT HIV that lingers in the body even after successful treatment poses a far bigger threat than was previously thought, research has shown.

The hidden virus reservoir may be 60 times larger than earlier estimates, according to the new findings. The sleeping viruses, called proviruses, continue to be a danger because they can become reactivated despite treatment with the best HIV drugs. The discovery is reported in the journal 'Cell'.

NEW DRUG DEATH FEARS

ADDICTION services in Dublin fear that a previously unseen drug linked to numerous deaths on the continent could find its way onto the capital's streets after police discovered the pills in Northern Ireland.

The ecstasy-type pills, which are red/brown or red/grey in colour and have a cherry logo stamp, are at the centre of a probe in Hungary where eight deaths are associated with the drug.

Irish Independent

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