Saturday 10 December 2016

Daughter of cult leader hated her mother, court told

David Wilcock in London

Published 20/11/2015 | 02:30

The court has already heard claims that members of the commune were encouraged to spy and inform on each other in an atmosphere of fear and paranoia. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto
The court has already heard claims that members of the commune were encouraged to spy and inform on each other in an atmosphere of fear and paranoia. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto

A woman allegedly held prisoner by her communist cult leader father for 30 years has told a court that she hated the woman she later found out was her mother.

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The woman was the child of Aravindan Balakrishnan (75) with his follower Sian Davies, who later died, but only knew her as Comrade Sian, she told Mr Balakrishnan's trial.

His daughter, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, said she was told she was a "waif" adopted by the group with Miss Davies's name on her birth certificate as a paper convenience.

She told the jury that Miss Davies was "extra unkind" to her in the commune during the 1980s and often found fault with her behaviour. She wrote in her diary that she "hated her" after she died, the court heard.

The woman said: "She (Sian) would be extra unkind and report me, getting me into more trouble. There was no affection between us. I really didn't like her. She scared me like hell."

The court has already heard claims that members of the commune were encouraged to spy and inform on each other in an atmosphere of fear and paranoia.

The trial at Southwark Crown Court in London has already been told of allegations that Mr Balakrishnan's daughter was beaten, bullied, banned from going to school or playing with friends, and barely left the house.

Fake

Giving evidence via video-link yesterday, she said she once saw Miss Davies cry when she was writing a fake backstory of her parents that she was told by Balakrishnan to create - that her father "died in a people's war" in Peru and her mother in childbirth.

The woman added that "at the time I didn't realise why she was crying", saying she believed she was moved by the story of her "parents'" sacrifice.

She went on to say that Mr Balakrishnan, known as Comrade Bala, was treated "like a god" in the south London commune. She said: "The idea was that one day Bala was going to rule the world and the whole world was going to become like this (a commune)."

Balakrishnan, of Enfield, north London, denies seven counts of indecent assault and four counts of rape against two women during the 1970s and 1980s. The case continues.

Irish Independent

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