Wednesday 28 September 2016

Cameron admits Britain is unprepared for Brexit

Peter Dominiczak

Published 11/01/2016 | 02:30

Mr Cameron made it clear that he would not resign if Britain votes to leave the EU, despite a number of Eurosceptics privately saying they will publicly call for him to step down in the event of a vote to leave.
Mr Cameron made it clear that he would not resign if Britain votes to leave the EU, despite a number of Eurosceptics privately saying they will publicly call for him to step down in the event of a vote to leave.

David Cameron has insisted he "will make it work" if Britain votes to leave the EU but admits the UK Government has no contingency plans in place for a Brexit, just months before the in-out referendum.

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In comments that infuriated Eurosceptics, the UK prime minister said that leaving the EU "is not the right answer", despite not yet having completed his renegotiation with Brussels.

Mr Cameron also made it clear that he would not resign if Britain votes to leave the EU, despite a number of Eurosceptics privately saying they will publicly call for him to step down in the event of a vote to leave.

Eurosceptic Tories including David Davis, the former shadow home secretary, branded Mr Cameron's admission on contingency planning "disgraceful".

Speaking to the BBC's 'Andrew Marr Show', Mr Cameron appeared to pre-empt the result of his renegotiation by saying that leaving the EU would be bad for Britain.

He also said that the Civil Service was not doing any work on what would happen to the UK in the event of a vote to leave the EU in the in-out referendum, which Mr Cameron said that he wanted to hold in the summer.

Asked whether the UK government is "prepared for the possibility" of Britain leaving the EU, Mr Cameron said: "I don't think that is the right answer… but were that to be the answer we would have to do everything necessary to make that work. We put it in the manifesto, it's the public that will decide this, not the civil servants."

Mr Cameron added that "the Civil Service were working round the clock to support my renegotiation".

When asked whether he would remain as prime minister if Britain votes to leave the EU after he has recommended staying, Mr Cameron said: "The answer to that is yes. My policy is to hold a renegotiation and then a referendum, that's what we promised in the manifesto, and then to abide by what the British public say.

"I hope that the answer will be staying in a reformed Europe."

Telegraph.co.uk

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