Tuesday 27 June 2017

Young woman who claimed winning Euromillions 'ruined her life' scoops winnings on latest bet

Jane Park
Jane Park
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

A young woman who claimed winning the Euromillions "ruined" her life has scooped up more cash on her latest bet.

Jane Park, who won £1m at the age of 17, previously said she often thought things would have been better if she had never won.

Now, she's won €1,410 after placing a €22 bet on a football accumulator, The Sun reports.

She posted the betting slip on her Facebook page at the weekend with the caption, 'Happy Saturday'.

The win comes after it was reported Park, now 21, had moved back in with her mother and was selling her furniture on facebook.

The goods up for sale included a red sofa, white table and chairs. 

She sold her three bedroom house in December after previously renting it out.

Park recently hit headlines after she argued that someone of her age should not have been allowed to win such a substantial sum of money. She said 18 should be the minimum age for winning the lottery and suggested the current limit of 16 was too young.

She said she had become bored of relentless consumption and felt like it failed to offered long-term genuine happiness. Before winning the lottery, Ms Park worked as an admin temp for £8 an hour and lived in a small flat with her mum in Edinburgh.

“I thought it would make it 10 times better but it’s made it 10 times worse. I wish I had no money most days. I say to myself, ‘My life would be so much easier if I hadn’t won’,” she previously told the Sunday People.

“People look at me and think, ‘I wish I had her lifestyle, I wish I had her money.’ But they don’t realise the extent of my stress. I have material things but apart from that my life is empty. What is my purpose in life?”

“I think 18 should be the minimum age for winning the lottery, at the least. The current age of 16 is far too young.”

Despite the fact that Camelot, which runs EuroMillions in the UK, appointed an adviser to help Ms Park deal with her newly accumulated wealth, she said it was family advice that helped her keep her spending in check.

“I’ve read about other lottery winners who’ve just blown it all and I can totally see how it can be done,” she said. “I was stuck in front of a financial adviser who was using words like investment bonds. I had no clue what they meant.”

Ms Park said it was unsettling how differently her life had turned out from her friends, making her feel isolated.

“It’s scary how different my life is from my friends’. When they say they’re stressed about the money they mean their wages are s***,” she said. “There’s no one in the same boat as me, no one who really understands. I feel like I’m a 40-year-old.”

A spokesperson for Camelot told The Independent: "Camelot takes its duty of care to winners very seriously and all major winners are offered support and advice for as long as they wish. That support is tailored to each winner's situation and circumstances – and for younger winners, their age will obviously be an important factor in the advice and support offered.

“Following her win, Jane received extensive support from Camelot," it continued. "A dedicated winners’ adviser visited Jane at home to pay out her prize, arrange private banking and support her through the publicity when she chose to share news of her win.  An independent financial and legal panel was set up shortly after her win and we put Jane in touch with another winner who won at the same age, to share their experience and help Jane adjust to the win.

“We keep in contact with all major winners for as long as they wish and have been in touch with Jane from time to time since her win to offer ongoing support. Of course, it is always up to the winners themselves as to whether they want to take us up that ongoing support and advice – but the door is always open and we will continue to support Jane in any way we can if that is what decides she wants.”

Camelot said the minimum age limit to play the lottery was an issue for Parliament to deal with.

“Anyone over the age of 16 can play the lottery, and therefore win a prize,” they said in a statement. “Camelot doesn’t set the age limit to play – this was agreed at the launch of the National Lottery back in 1994 and so any questions about the legal age to play would be a matter for Parliament."

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