Monday 29 May 2017

Ched Evans jurors told to 'make decisions without emotion'

Footballer Ched Evans arrives at Cardiff Crown Court with partner Natasha Massey Credit: Ben Birchall/PA Wire
Footballer Ched Evans arrives at Cardiff Crown Court with partner Natasha Massey Credit: Ben Birchall/PA Wire

Jurors were told to "make decisions without emotion" as they began their deliberations on the eighth day of Ched Evans's rape retrial.

The 27-year-old Wales international is accused of raping a teenager at a Premier lnn near Rhyl in North Wales in the early hours of May 30 2011.

Evans was originally found guilty following a trial four years ago, but the conviction was quashed by the Court of Appeal and a retrial ordered.

Over the past fortnight, jurors at Cardiff Crown Court have heard evidence from the complainant, the former Manchester City player as well as several other witnesses in the case.

The prosecution say that the alleged victim was "stumbling" drunk and had no memory of being taken back to a Premier Inn before having sex with Evans and one of his friends.

It is also the Crown's case that the defendant "surreptitiously" left the hotel via a fire exit before the woman woke up naked, alone and confused.

Footballer Ched Evans outside at Cardiff Crown Court
Footballer Ched Evans outside at Cardiff Crown Court

The defendant, who denies rape, insists the sex was consensual and she had looked at him and asked for oral sex after he walked into a hotel room.

And in his evidence, the soccer star - who now plays for League One side Chesterfield - said complainant was no more drunk than him and she was capable of making decisions and getting into different positions.

On the seventh day of the case, trial judge Mrs Justice Nicola Davies gave a series of legal directions to jury ahead of closing speeches from the Crown and defence.

She told jurors they would have to decide two issues in the case.

"Are you sure that the complainant did not consent to have sex with the defendant," she said.

"And two: Are you sure that the defendant did not reasonably believe that the complainant was consenting.

"You decision must be made calmly, objectively and without emotion."

"You are not here to judge the morals of any person in this case and this includes the complainant and the defendant."

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