Thursday 27 July 2017

375,000 sign petition to allow treatment for sick boy Charlie

Charlie Gard Photo: PA
Charlie Gard Photo: PA

Gregory Katz

The parents of terminally ill boy Charlie Gard say they believe an experimental treatment can help him as they urge the courts to give him "the chance he needs".

The couple emerged from Great Ormond Street Hospital in London to thank supporters from around the world for backing their call to allow the 11-month-old to be given a medication available abroad, which they admit has only a 10pc chance of working.

His mother Connie Yates and father Chris Gard said they reluctantly left baby Charlie's bedside to express their gratitude to the 375,000 people who have signed a petition supporting them.

Their case will go back to the High Court in London today to hear fresh arguments following claims of "new information" from researchers at the Vatican's children's hospital.

The pair remain hopeful ahead of the hearing and said they will continue to fight for Charlie to have the treatment.

Ms Yates said: "I absolutely believe this medication will work. I'm not a doctor but I feel like I am an expert in his condition now."

Charlie Gard’s parents Connie Yates and Chris Gard delivered a petition with more than 350,000 signatures to Great Ormond Street Hospital in London to support their case. Photo: PA
Charlie Gard’s parents Connie Yates and Chris Gard delivered a petition with more than 350,000 signatures to Great Ormond Street Hospital in London to support their case. Photo: PA

The 31-year-old said they had the support of seven specialists around the world, including one in England, and called for people to "trust us as parents and trust the other doctors who are experts in this condition".

Two US congressmen also said they would table legislation to give Charlie and his family US resident status in a bid to allow them to travel there for treatment.

Ms Yates said she accepted not everyone would agree with her and her partner's position but maintained their son is not suffering.

She said: "There's a lot of misinformation out there in the media, but that happens, you've got to take that. But basically we wouldn't be able to sit there and watch him in pain, and suffering.

"We're not like that, we're not evil. We're not doing this for us. He's our son. We want what's best for him."

Doctors at Great Ormond Street have argued the treatment would not help.

Irish Independent

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