Thursday 29 September 2016

Block Donald Trump from UK campaign gets huge support as storm rages over Muslim ban call

'Divisive, unhelpful and quite simply wrong' - David Cameron

Published 09/12/2015 | 07:31

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as if he is sleeping while talking about his opponent Jeb Bush
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as if he is sleeping while talking about his opponent Jeb Bush
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally

Republicans, Democrats, world leaders and even JK Rowling all agree: Donald Trump's call to ban Muslims from entering the United States goes too far.

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The Republican presidential front-runner's statement advocating a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States" was condemned as bigoted, unconstitutional and potentially dangerous for American interests abroad.

David Cameron, breaking the custom of British leaders not commenting on American presidential contenders, criticised it as "divisive, unhelpful and quite simply wrong."

Farhan Haq, United Nations spokesman, said Ban Ki-moon, the secretary-general, denounced "any kind of rhetoric that relies on Islamophobia, xenophobia, any other appeal to hate any groups"

Prime Minister David Cameron speaking during a visit to the De Ferrers Academy in Burton Upon Trent Credit: Darren Staples/PA Wire
Prime Minister David Cameron speaking during a visit to the De Ferrers Academy in Burton Upon Trent Credit: Darren Staples/PA Wire

Mr Trump's campaign has been marked by inflammatory statements, dating back to its launch with rhetoric that some Mexican immigrants, who entered the country illegally, were drug smugglers and rapists - but even that didn't evoke the same widespread level of contempt.

"This is not conservatism," said Paul Ryan, House Speaker, after a closed-door Republican caucus meeting. "What was proposed yesterday is not what this party stands for, and more importantly it's not what this country stands for."

The billionaire businessman and former reality television star has maintained his lead in early opinion surveys, despite the controversies, vexing his Republican rivals and alarming a Republican establishment in panic over the damage they fear he's doing to a deeply divided party.

Mr Trump, who appears to revel in the attention, didn't back down from his proposal on Tuesday evening , saying that banning Muslims "until our country's representatives can figure out what the hell is going on" is warranted after last month's attacks by Muslim extremists in Paris and last week's shootings in San Bernardino, California.

He rebuffed allegations that he was a bigot in an interview with ABC.

"Somebody in this country has to say what's right," he said. "It's short-term. Let our country get its act together."

On Tuesday morning he used London as an example of what could go wrong.

Speaking to MSNBC in the US, he said: "We have places in London and other places that are so radicalised that the police are afraid for their own lives. We have to be very smart and very vigilant."

Boris Johnson, the mayor of London, ridiculed the business tycoon, saying: "The only reason I wouldn't go to some parts of New York is the real risk of meeting Donald Trump."

And Twitter joined in the mockery with the hashtag #TrumpFacts.

Overnight more than 20,000 people had signed a petition demanding that Mr Trump be banned from entering the UK.

At the White House, Josh Earnest, press secretary, described Trump as a "carnival barker" and called on his rivals to denounce their fellow candidate.

"What he said is disqualifying," he said. "Any Republican who's too fearful of the Republican base to admit it has no business serving as president, either."

Telegraph.co.uk

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