independent

Wednesday 16 April 2014

Deal brokered to ease blockade

Syrian refugee boys play in front of their family tents, at Zaatari Refugee Camp, in Mafraq, Jordan (AP)

Government officials and rebels have reached a deal to ease a weeks-long blockade on a rebel-held town near the Syrian capital, allowing food to reach civilians there for the first time in weeks, activists said.

The truce is the latest to be struck in recent months between President Bashar Assad's government and disparate rebel groups in the country's conflict.

It comes as the main Western-backed Syrian opposition group was holding the second of two days of meetings in Istanbul to decide whether to attend a proposed peace conference the US and Russia are trying to convene in Geneva by the end of this year.

The Syrian National Coalition has demanded Mr Assad step down in any transitional government as a condition for participation in the talks. Syrian officials say MrAssad will stay in his post at least until his term ends in 2014 and that he may run for re-election.

Coalition spokesman Louay Safi said discussions were still ongoing.

"There are people who are concerned and worried that not enough preparation has taken place. And there are those who would like to make a decision but with some preparation," he said in Istanbul.

According to a draft statement that the coalition officials say the group intends to vote on, the opposition in exile affirms its "readiness" to take part in a transitional government, but one that has full powers, including executive powers.

A copy of the draft obtained by The Associated Press also said the coalition will consult with "revolutionary forces inside Syria, as well as Arab and international allies, to explain the coalition's position and bolster unanimity over the coalition's decision."

The coalition is also expected to approve a list of cabinet of ministers presented by interim prime minister, Ahmad Toumeh, who was elected in September.

The Western-backed group also has called for goodwill measures from the Assad government, including lifting sieges on rebel-held areas. It wasn't clear whether the deal in Qudsaya was such a gesture, as neither rebels nor Syrian officials comment on such deals.

An activist group, the Qudsaya Media Team, confirmed the truce in a statement but gave few details.

Rami Abdurrahman of the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the deal allowed food and flour to enter the town on the outskirts of Damascus, under blockade since October. The Observatory monitors the conflict in Syria through a network of activists on the ground.

All warring sides in Syria's civil war have blockaded towns to squeeze the opposing fighters and their support networks, but the most affected have been poor people struggling to buy food, the elderly, the sick and children.

In recent weeks, a variety of Syrian mediators have been trying to ease blockades in several areas, with modest success.

Syria's government is under pressure from the international community to allow food and medical aid into blockaded areas, particularly after reports emerged of widespread hunger in the Damascus suburb of Moadamiyeh this year. It appears civilians have also pressured rebels to accept truces.

Meanwhile, fighting raged for control of a key base protecting the government-held airport in the northern city of Aleppo.

The Brigade 80 base has been reported to have changed hands multiple times in the past days. It first fell to rebels in February, but the government retook it last week. Activists said that it was recaptured by rebels overnight Friday but by this afternoon, troops loyal to Assad were again in control, said the Observatory and a Lebanese television channel that closely follows Syria.

Another pro-rebel activist in the Aleppo province said the clashes were still ongoing and it wasn't clear what the outcome of the fighting yet was.

The rebels fighting at Brigade 80 have been led by fighters from the Islamic Tawhid Brigade and two al Qaida-linked groups, the Nusra Front and the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant.

The activist and the Observatory said gunmen from the Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah group were fighting alongside Syrian troops at the site. The government-held Aleppo International Airport, which has been closed due to fighting for almost a year, is one of the Syrian rebels' major objectives.

AP

Press Association

Also in this Section

Classifieds

CarsIreland

Independent Shopping.ie

Meet, chat and connect with
singles in your area

Independent Shopping.ie

Meet Singles Now

Findajob

Apps

Now available on

Independent.ie on Twitter

More

Most Read

Independent Gallery

Your photos

Send us your weather photos promo

Celebrity News