News World News

Wednesday 17 September 2014

Brown bread followed by white bread...starters in a lavish 18-course North Korean meal to celebrate Kim Jong-Un's birthday

Published 13/01/2014 | 13:17

  • Share
Kim Jongun, centre, next to his wife Ri Solju, left, talks to Dennis Rodman, while watching a basketball game between North Korean players and former NBA players in Pyongyang. KCNA
Kim Jongun, centre, next to his wife Ri Solju, left, talks to Dennis Rodman, while watching a basketball game between North Korean players and former NBA players in Pyongyang. KCNA

Brown bread followed by white bread – those are the first two courses in a lavish 18-course North Korean meal to celebrate Kim Jong Un's birthday.

  • Share
  • Go To

While the average North Korean lives in abject poverty, Kim Jong Un wined and dined visiting foreign delegates last week.

Matt Cooper has revealed that the dictator looked like he was having "the time of his life" at this birthday celebrations while his people - of which there are 24.7 million - live below the breadline.

Guests were served up two breads to begin their meal and they also had sturrgeon, the broadcaster revealed.

“[Kim Jong Un] was having the time of his life. He was loving it. I mean, who isn’t going to love when you walk into the room and you’re like a rock star and the whole place erupts and starts cheering?” the Irish journalist told Today FM's Ray Darcy.

“Everyone else was clapping wildly and I had actually stopped.”

“I clapped politely. I stopped – I didn’t do the ...four and a half minutes that they were all clapping at the start. I clapped politely as you do as a guest...as I would do if any leader of a country came along. And then I stopped.”

“They’re a bunch of murderous thugs and they run an appalling propaganda. The standard of living of people is really poor. They seem to suck an awful lot of joy out of the place,” he said this morning.

Despite the excitement of North Korean officials for their 31-year-old  ruler, drab misery reminiscent of post-war Eastern Europe was evident in Pyongyang, he said.

“Yes they got all very, very excited when they saw Kim but apart from that... [Pyongyang] is full of] drab, dreadful apartment complexes.”

“Even at ground floor level where the shops should be, there’s nothing in them. There’s no trade, there’s no commerce. There were a couple of street stalls – that was it.”

“The lights are only on one side of the road. In the evening time, the city is almost completely dark.”

Matt Cooper, who is seeking a publisher deal for a book on the reclusive country, said he was constantly monitored and shadowed during his visit to Pyongyang to attend the basketball game to celebrate North Korean dicator Kim Jong-Un's birthday.

Read More

Editors Choice

Also in World News