Monday 24 October 2016

Bobby Jindal drops out of US presidental race

Published 18/11/2015 | 00:11

Bobby Jindal is quitting next year's race to be US president (AP)
Bobby Jindal is quitting next year's race to be US president (AP)

Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal is quitting next year's race to be US president, ending a campaign that failed to gain much support among Republicans.

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Telling Fox News "this is not my time", h e said he was not ready to endorse another candidate, but intended to support the eventual Republican presidential nominee.

The governor, who is term-limited and will be out of office in January, says he will work with a think-tank he started a few years ago, America Next.

Mr Jindal, 44, America's first elected Indian-American governor, focused his entire campaign effort on the early voting state of Iowa, but never won much support there against higher-profile Republican contenders Donald Trump and Ben Carson.

His fund raising lagged and his low poll numbers kept him off the main debate stages.

"I've come to the realisation that this is not my time," he said, as he announced the decision to suspend his campaign.

He said his think-tank would devise "a blueprint for making this the American century".

"Going forward, I believe we have to be the party of growth and we can never stop being the party that believes in opportunity. We cannot settle for the left's view of envy and division," he said.

Meanwhile Mr Carson was facing new questions about his foreign policy capabilities.

O ne of his closest advisers, Armstrong Williams, said Mr Carson was having intense briefing sessions with former US State Department and military officials, but admitted the retired neurosurgeon sometimes struggled to explain foreign affairs on the campaign trail.

The New York Times published a story quoting one of Mr Carson's advisers saying the candidate had trouble grasping the complexities of the Middle East.

Former CIA agent Duane Clarridge told the newspaper Mr Carson needed briefings so "we can make him smart".

The Carson campaign hit back at Mr Clarridge, describing him as "an elderly gentleman" who was not among Mr Carson's inner circle.

Press Association

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