Wednesday 26 October 2016

Bad breast milk

Published 12/10/2015 | 02:30

Breast milk sold online by British mothers contains potentially deadly bacteria, according to an investigation.

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A BBC reporter posed as the father of a six-month-old baby and bought milk from mothers across the country.

Microbiologists discovered a third of the samples contained E.coli, two contained Candida (thrush) and one contained the deadly bacteria pseudomonas aeruginosa.

This bug caused the deaths of four babies in a neonatal unit in Northern Ireland in 2012.

Sisters reunited

Two orphaned sisters separated decades ago in Korea have been reunited after miraculously getting hired on the same floor of a southwest Florida hospital.

Holly Hoyle O'Brien was adopted by an American couple in 1978 when she was nine. Meagan Hughes was also adopted by an American family and grew up in Kingston, New York.

Earlier this year, O'Brien was hired at Bayfront Health in Port Charlotte, working as a nursing assistant. Two months later Hughes was hired and the two realised the connection and they took DNA tests to confirm they were sisters.

Blatter to fight on

Sepp Blatter will battle on despite his suspension as head of world soccer body FIFA amid corruption investigations.

"I am a fighter," he told the 'Schweiz am Sonntag' newspaper.

"They can destroy me, but they cannot destroy my life's work."

Blatter, who has headed FIFA since 1998, was provisionally suspended from his duties as president for 90 days by the group's ethics committee on Thursday. He has denied all allegations.

Clarkson dilemma

Jeremy Clarkson has revealed he thought about doing "nothing at all" after Top Gear, but then Amazon Prime came "riding over the horizon" and a new motoring show began to take shape.

But the outspoken presenter said getting to the point of recording the first show "had not been easy".

Writing for The Sunday Times' Driving supplement, Clarkson described the uncertainty in the days after the BBC announced it would not be renewing his contract as a result of a "fracas".

He said: "I didn't really know what I was going to do. A large part of me considering the appealing option of 'nothing at all'. A smaller part thought I should change tack and do a programme about farming."

Irish Independent

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