News Australasia

Tuesday 30 May 2017

Terrifying moment boy surfer (10) photo-bombed by great white shark

Chris Hasson, 10-year-old Eden Hasson, Chris' son, surfs near what is believed to be a great white shark at Samurai Beach, Port Stephens, Australia. James Cook University shark researcher Andrew Chin says the photographed shark is possibly a small great white. (Chris Hasson via AP)
Chris Hasson, 10-year-old Eden Hasson, Chris' son, surfs near what is believed to be a great white shark at Samurai Beach, Port Stephens, Australia. James Cook University shark researcher Andrew Chin says the photographed shark is possibly a small great white. (Chris Hasson via AP)
Amy Molloy

Amy Molloy

A 10-year-old surfer has had a close encounter with a photo-bombing shark that shared a wave with him off an Australian beach.

Chris Hasson said he was taking photos of his son Eden riding a wave off Samurai Beach at Port Stephens, 110 miles north of Sydney, on Tuesday when something unexpected and indistinct caught his eye.

He discovered he had photographed the face of a twisting shark just below the surface with his son on an apparent collision course.

"Check its mouth," Mr Hasson wrote shortly afterwards on Facebook. "It's rolled over having a good look at his yummy yellow new wetsuit."

Speaking to the Sydney Herald, the lucky surfer said: "When I took off I thought I saw something and when I went to do the first snap off the top I hit something and I thought it was seaweed."

"Then when [Dad] called me in I thought it must be a shark because there was a big school of fish."

In this photo from Jan. 24, 2017, provided by Chris Hasson, 10-year-old Eden Hasson, Chris' son, surfs near what is believed to be a great white shark at Samurai Beach, Port Stephens, Australia. James Cook University shark researcher Andrew Chin says the photographed shark is possibly a small great white. (Chris Hasson via AP)
In this photo from Jan. 24, 2017, provided by Chris Hasson, 10-year-old Eden Hasson, Chris' son, surfs near what is believed to be a great white shark at Samurai Beach, Port Stephens, Australia. James Cook University shark researcher Andrew Chin says the photographed shark is possibly a small great white. (Chris Hasson via AP)

James Cook University shark researcher Andrew Chin said the photographed shark was possibly a small great white.

Mr Hasson says shark experts have since told him it was a juvenile great white about 8ft long.

Eden was not injured.

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