Thursday 27 November 2014

Young South Korean soldier who killed 5 comrades has suffered self-inflicted gunshot wound

Ju-min Park

Published 23/06/2014 | 06:36

South Korean military authorities have surrounded a soldier who fled his border outpost after killing five comrades, a defence official said (AP)
South Korean military authorities have surrounded a soldier who fled his border outpost after killing five comrades, a defence official said (AP)
South Korean army soldiers search for a South Korean soldier who is on the run after a shooting incident in Goseong, South Korea, Sunday, June 22, 2014. The military searched Sunday for an armed South Korean soldier who fled after killing five of his comrades and wounding seven at an outpost near the North Korean border.(AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Korean soldiers patrol during a search and arrest operation in Goseong June 22, 2014. South Korean special forces joined a manhunt on Sunday for a soldier who killed five comrades in a grenade and gun attack at a base near the North Korean border, and once dawn broke military helicopters began scouring the forested hillsides. REUTERS/Hwang Gwang-mo/Yonhap
South Korean army soldiers on the trucks move to search for a South Korean conscript soldier who is on the run after a shooting incident in Goseong, South Korea, Sunday, June 22, 2014. South Korean military authorities have surrounded a soldier who fled his border outpost after killing five comrades the day before and were trying to persuade him to surrender, a defense official said Sunday.(AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Korean army soldiers aim their machine guns as they search for a South Korean conscript soldier who is on the run after a shooting incident in Goseong, South Korea, Sunday, June 22, 2014. South Korean military authorities have surrounded a soldier who fled his border outpost after killing five comrades the day before and were trying to persuade him to surrender, a defense official said Sunday.(AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Korean army soldiers search for a South Korean soldier who is on the run after a shooting incident in Goseong, South Korea, Sunday, June 22, 2014. The military searched Sunday for an armed South Korean soldier who fled after killing five of his comrades and wounding seven at an outpost near the North Korean border.(AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Korean army soldiers on a truck search for a South Korean conscript soldier who is on the run after a shooting incident in Goseong, South Korea, Sunday, June 22, 2014. South Korean military authorities have surrounded a soldier who fled his border outpost after killing five comrades the day before and were trying to persuade him to surrender, a defense official said Sunday.(AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
A wounded soldier is carried from an ambulance to a hospital in Gangneung June 22, 2014. A South Korean conscript soldier shot and killed five of his fellow unit members and injured five others late on Saturday at a guard post near the heavily armed border with North Korea, a South Korean official said. REUTERS/Seo Geun-young/News1

A South Korean conscript soldier who shot and killed five of his comrades in a grenade and gun attack near the armed border with North Korea has suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound and is being transferred to a hospital, an official has said.

"At around 14:55 (5.55am GMT), Sergeant Lim harmed himself in his side with a K-2 rifle and was sent to the hospital," the military official said.

The weapon refers to the stand issue assault rifle used by the South Korean military.

South Korean troops had cornered the soldier to a densely wooded area on Monday, and were trying to negotiate a peaceful end to a manhunt that started two days earlier with the grenade attack.

Earlier, the Defence Ministry said officials were trying to persuade the 22-year-old to surrender in a densely forested area near a small town in Goseong county, a mountainous region on the eastern coast of the peninsula.

Late on Saturday night the soldier threw a grenade and opened fire, killing five members of his unit and wounding seven at a base outpost in Goseong county.

The soldier, surnamed Lim, was described by an official as an "introvert" and said there had been earlier concerns over his psychological health, but he was deemed fit to be deployed to the outpost after passing a test in November.

A massive manhunt saw troops, who had orders to "shoot to kill" if the soldier failed to surrender, exchange gunfire with him on Sunday. A platoon leader was wounded in a gunfight.

"The idea is to capture him, but we are trying to get him to surrender," Defence Ministry spokesman Kim Min-seok told a briefing. "We are tightening the circle around him."

The soldier was allowed to speak to his father by telephone and officials are working with his parents to try to convince him to turn himself in, Kim said.

Another soldier was wounded on Monday in a friendly fire incident during the pursuit for the rogue soldier, Kim said.

CONCERNS ABOUT NEW RECRUITS

The military has been criticised before for lax discipline in some units and failure to prevent previous cases where soldiers, suffering personal problems, have shot fellow soldiers.

In a similar incident in 2011, a South Korean marine went on a shooting spree at a base near the tense maritime border with North Korea, killing four fellow soldiers before trying to blow himself up with a hand grenade.

Kim, the defence ministry spokesman, said a large number of conscript soldiers, most of whom are in their early 20s, are classified as "of interest" and are under supervision by the command for concerns over potential disciplinary or mental health issues.

About 800 soldiers of the 22nd Infantry Division that serves the Goseong region, or 9 percent of division force, are under supervision, Kim said. Lim was one of them.

All able-bodied South Korean men serve about two years under a conscription system that makes up a large part of the 600,000 active service troops, and there are concerns that new recruits are softer and find it harder to adapt to military life.

A lockdown was in effect around the search zone, including guard posts along the Demilitarized Zone border, a 4-km (2.5-mile) wide swathe of land serving as a buffer between the two Koreas since the end of the 1950-53 Korean war.

The two Koreas remain technically at war since the conflict ended in a truce not a peace treaty, and the border is regarded as potentially one of the world's most dangerous flashpoints.

Reuters

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