Thursday 23 October 2014

No Chinese terrorism link to missing Malaysian airliner

Published 18/03/2014 | 07:42

Students from the Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino High School walk on a mural depicting the missing Malaysia Airlines plane Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at their campus at Makati city, east of Manila, Philippines
Students from the Benigno "Ninoy" Aquino High School walk on a mural depicting the missing Malaysia Airlines plane Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at their campus at Makati city, east of Manila, Philippines
A woman reads messages for passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane, at a shopping mall in Petaling Jaya, near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Tuesday, March 18, 2014
A woman reads messages for passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane, at a shopping mall in Petaling Jaya, near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Tuesday, March 18, 2014
A relative of a Chinese passenger aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 shows a paper reading "Hunger strike protest, Respect life, Return my relative, Don't want become victim of politics, Tell the truth" as she speaks to the media outside a hotel ballroom after attending a briefing held by airlines' officials in Beijing, China, Tuesday, March 18, 2014
A relative of a Chinese passenger aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 shows a paper reading "Hunger strike protest, Respect life, Return my relative, Don't want become victim of politics, Tell the truth" as she speaks to the media outside a hotel ballroom after attending a briefing held by airlines' officials in Beijing, China, Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Checks into the background of all the Chinese nationals on board the missing Malaysian jetliner have uncovered no links to terrorism.

The remarks by the Chinese ambassador in Kuala Lumpur will dampen speculation that Uighur separatists in far western Xinjiang province might have been involved with the disappearance of the Boeing 777 and its 239 passengers and crew early on March 8.

The plane was carrying 154 Chinese passengers, when Malaysian officials say someone on board deliberately diverted it from its route to Beijing less than one hour into the flight. A massive search operation has yet to find any trace of the plane.

Chinese Ambassador to Malaysia Huang Huikang said today that background checks on Chinese nationals did not uncover any evidence suggesting they were involved in hijacking or an act of terrorism against the plane, according to state news agency Xinhua.

He also said that Chinese authorities had begun searching for the plane on its territory.

Malaysian police are investigating the pilots and ground engineers of the plane, and have asked intelligence agencies from countries with passengers on board to carry out background checks on those passengers.

Malaysian authorities say that someone on board the flight switched off two vital pieces of communication equipment, allowing the plane to fly almost undetected.

Satellite data shows it might have ended up somewhere in a giant arc stretching from Central Asia to the southern reaches of the Indian Ocean.

Malaysian police say they are investigating the possibility of hijacking, sabotage, terrorism or issues related to the mental health of the pilots or anyone else on board, but have yet to give any update on what they have uncovered.

Malaysian military radar spotted the plane in the northern reaches of the Strait of Malacca at 2.14am local time on March 8, just over 90 minutes after it took off from Kuala Lumpur.

That is the plane's last known confirmed position.

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