Asia-Pacific

Wednesday 30 July 2014

Malaysia’s Transport Minister: "There is no real precedent for a situation like this. The plane vanished"

  • Hugh Dunleavy, commerical director of Malaysia Airlines: captain was a very seasoned pilot with an excellent record.
  • US investigators suspect missing Malaysian plane flew for hours past last confirmed location
  • Malaysian authorities deny WSJ report that plane flew on for four hours
  • Two million participants in 'crowd sourcing' search for plane
  • Malaysia probes passenger backgrounds for clues on missing flight
  • Investigators were focussing on four areas - hijacking, sabotage, psychological problems
  • Published 13/03/2014|06:23

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    KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA - MARCH 13:  Datuk Hishamuddin Hussein, Acting Minister of Transport (C) flanked by (L) Dato Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, DG of DCA and (R) Ahmad Jauhari Yahya, MAS CEO briefs the media that Malaysia Airline flight  MH370 is still missing on March 13, 2014 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  A Chinese agency has released a satellite image taken on March 9 of large floating debris in the waters between Kuala Lumpur and South Vietnam, reported to be a 'suspected crash area.'  Officials expanded the search area for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 yesterday, beyond the intended flight path to include the west of Malaysia at the Straits of Malacca as new information surfaces about the time Subang air traffic control lost contact with the aircraft. The flight carrying 239 passengers from Kuala Lumpur to Thailand was reported missing on the morning of March 8 after the crew failed to check in as scheduled.  (Photo by How Foo Yeen/Getty Images)
    Datuk Hishamuddin Hussein, Acting Minister of Transport (C) flanked by (L) Dato Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, DG of DCA and (R) Ahmad Jauhari Yahya, MAS CEO briefs the media that Malaysia Airline flight
    The last reported position of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 (flightradar24.com)
    A relative cries as she arrives at a hotel designated as a holding area for family members of passengers on board the missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner MH370, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, in Sepang, Malaysia. More than four days after a Malaysian jetliner went missing on route to Beijing, authorities acknowledged Wednesday they didn't know in which direction the plane and its 239 passengers was heading when it disappeared, vastly complicating efforts to find it.  (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)
    A relative cries as she arrives at a hotel designated as a holding area for family members of passengers on board the missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner MH370, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, in Sepang, Malaysia. More than four days after a Malaysian jetliner went missing on route to Beijing, authorities acknowledged Wednesday they didn't know in which direction the plane and its 239 passengers was heading when it disappeared, vastly complicating efforts to find it. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

    Six days after it disappeared without trace, more confusion – not less – engulfs the fate of missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 and her 239 passengers and crew.

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    At a press conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia’s Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said a search involving 12 nations and more than 80 aircraft and planes had still failed to uncover any trace of the Boeing 777. “There is no real precedent for a situation like this. The plane vanished,” he said.

    Mr Hussein strongly denied reports that data from the plane’s engines showed that it had flown for a further four hours from its last confirmed location and may have been intentionally diverted.

    Earlier, the Wall Street Journal reported that investigators in the US were  examining whether the missing plane was “intentionally diverted” from its planned route.

    US investigators are examining whether missing Flight MH370 was “intentionally diverted” from its planned route after new data revealed the plane may have flown for a further four hours from the point of its last confirmed location.

    A report in the Wall Street Journal said US counter-terrorism officials are examining the possibility the plane’s course was changed “with the intention of using it later for another purpose” and that its transponders were intentionally turned off to avoid radar detection. Police in Malaysia have been questioning the family of the chief pilot in an attempt to determine whether he was suffering any psychological problems.

    The report said data downloaded automatically from the plane’s engines, suggests the plane flew for a total of five hours. Its final confirmed location was at 1.31am last Saturday, about 40 minutes after it took off from Kuala Lumpur International Airport. At that point it was heading north-east across the mouth of the Gulf of Thailand on what should have been a six-hour flight to Beijing.

    If true, the information downloaded from the plane’s Rolls-Royce engines as part of a routine maintenance and monitoring programme, suggests the plane could have flown on for up to 2,000 miles and reached as far as northern India or even the north-west coast of Australia. It would expand the possible search area almost limitlessly.

     

     

    Earlier Hugh Dunleavy, the commercial director of Malaysia Airlines, said the captain in charge of the flight was a very seasoned pilot with an excellent record.

    "There have been absolutely no implications that we are aware of that there was anything untoward in either his behaviour or attitude," Dunleavy told Reuters in an interview.

    "We have no reason to believe that there was anything, any actions, internally by the crew that caused the disappearance of this aircraft."

    Dunleavy said he was sceptical of a report by a South African woman who said the co-pilot of the missing plane, Farid Ab Hamid, had invited her and a female travelling companion to sit in the cockpit during a flight two years ago, in an apparent breach of security.

    "Because just getting into that area requires you to go through the secure doors that we have in the cabin all the time," he said.

    "And not only would that have been unusual, but it also would have meant you'd have to walk by our cabin crew as well, and have the code to get through. So I'm dubious, but I'm going to let the authorities investigate and tell us what happened."

     

    PANews_P-d4a06a2c-a219-4b68-810c-c81e7acb29f4_I3.jpg 

    Yet the report says the data has led investigators in the US to pursue the prospect that the plane may have been diverted by a pilot or someone else. It is unclear whether the plane reached an alternate destination or if it crashed, potentially hundreds of miles from where an international search effort involving 12 countries and more than 80 boats and aircraft has been focused.

    Six days after the plane went missing, most reports had suggested that terrorism or hijacking had been largely discounted. But the report said the new data raised a “host of new questions and possibilities about what happened” to the plane and its 239 passengers and crew.

    The report said US investigators remained “fluid” as to the causes of the plane’s disappearance and that it remained unclear whether investigators had evidence indicating possible terrorism or espionage.

    12-malaysian.jpg 

    At the same time, local media in Malaysia said police had been speaking to the family of the the plane’s main pilot, Zaharie Ahmad Shah, to determine whether or not he was encountering any psychological problems. Mr Shah had more than 18,000 hours flying experience.

    Earlier this week, Malaysia’s police chief Khalid Abu Bakar said investigators were focussing on four areas - hijacking, sabotage, psychological problems and possible personal problems of the passengers or crew.

    The flurry of revelations came as an effort to locate the plane spread out over more than 27,000 nautical square miles. Search planes had been dispatched to a site believed to be the location of where a Chinese government agency website said a satellite had photographed three “suspicious floating objects” on Sunday. It is unclear why it took China so long to share the information.

    MALAY.jpg 

    The location was close to where the plane lost contact with air traffic control but by early Thursday afternoon local time, nothing had been found at the spot. The Associated Press said the head of Malaysia’s civil aviation authority, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, had confirmed no debris had been located by the Vietnamese and Malaysian plans dispatched there.

    Earlier on Thursday, China continued to put pressure on Malaysia. Of the 239 people on board, more than 150 were from China. China has criticised Malaysia for the slow pace of the operation and what it has called conflicting information about the search.

    Speaking in Beijing, Premier Li Keqiang, called for the “relevant party” step up coordination while China’s civil aviation chief. “We will not give up on any suspected clue that has been found,” he said. “This is an international and large-scale search operation involving many countries.”

    The last definitive sighting on civilian radar screens of MH370 came at 1.31am on Saturday, less than an hour after the plane took. On Wednesday Rodzali Daud, the Malaysian air force chief, said a dot was plotted on military radar at 2.15 a.m., 200 miles north-west of Penang Island off Malaysia’s west coast at the northern tip of the Strait of Malacca.

    MALAYSIA Fl_43.jpg 

    But he stressed that there was no confirmation that the dot on the radar was Flight MH370. He said Malaysia was sharing the data with the US Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Security Board.

    Malaysia Airlines has said that as a mark of respect to the passengers and crew on board MH370, the MH370 and MH371 flight codes are to be will be retired from Kuala Lumpur- Beijing-Kuala Lumpur route.

    Independent News Service

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