Wednesday 18 October 2017

Debris confirmed as being from missing flight 370

French police officers carry a piece of debris from a plane known as a flaperon in Saint-Andre, Reunion Island. Photo: AP
French police officers carry a piece of debris from a plane known as a flaperon in Saint-Andre, Reunion Island. Photo: AP

Eileen Ng in Kuala Lumpur

Two more pieces of debris found in South Africa and near Mauritius are "almost certainly" from flight 370, which disappeared in 2014 with 239 people on board, the Malaysian government has said.

The discovery brings the total number of pieces found and believed to be from the missing Malaysia Airlines jet to five.

Although the discoveries have bolstered authorities' assertion that the plane went down somewhere in the Indian Ocean, none of the parts has so far yielded any clues as to exactly where and why it crashed.

Those elusive answers lie with the flight data recorders, or black boxes, which may never be found.

The two newly identified pieces of debris were found in March. Malaysian transport minister Liow Tiong Lai said one was an engine cowling piece and the other is an interior cabin panel piece discovered on Rodrigues Island, off Mauritius - the first interior part found from the missing plane.

An international team of experts in Australia who examined the debris concluded that both pieces were consistent with panels found on a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 aircraft, Mr Liow said.

This handout combo released on May 12, 2016 by Australian Transport Sefety Bureau and Malaysian MOT shows an item of debris recovered from the beaches in South Africa and Mauritus. Getty Images
This handout combo released on May 12, 2016 by Australian Transport Sefety Bureau and Malaysian MOT shows an item of debris recovered from the beaches in South Africa and Mauritus. Getty Images

All five pieces have been found in various spots around the Indian Ocean.

Last year, a wing part from the plane washed ashore on France's Reunion Island.

The jet, which vanished on March 8, 2014, while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, is believed to have crashed somewhere in a remote stretch of the southern Indian Ocean, about 1,800km off Australia's west coast.

Irish Independent

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