Thursday 27 July 2017

The Mayor of Pittsburgh and Donald Trump look to be on very different pages regarding the Paris climate deal

Trump’s decision to remove the US from the agreement drew widespread international criticism.

By Max McLean

President Donald Trump has announced he is pulling the US out of the world’s first comprehensive deal on climate change, but not everyone’s on board with the decision.

Trump said the US would withdraw from the Paris Agreement, secured in the French capital in December 2015, which commits countries to curbing rising global temperatures, but he also raised the possibility of negotiating to re-enter the Paris accord or an entirely new deal on terms that were “fair” to the US.

Sean Spicer, the White House press secretary, was tweeting parts of Trump’s speech, including this:

Unfortunately for Trump it looks as though the Mayor of Pittsburgh, Bill Peduto, was not all that keen on the decision to remove the USA from the agreement in the first place, and replied to the president’s comments with this tweet:

Trump’s move drew widespread international criticism, with campaigners in the UK labelling it an “act of vandalism”, and politicians both current and former speaking out against it.

Trump’s predecessor Barack Obama, who signed the Paris Agreement last year without US Senate ratification, described the Trump administration as joining “a small handful of nations that reject the future” by withdrawing from the pact.

Meanwhile former vice president Al Gore was clearly not in favour of the move.

Obviously not everyone was against the decision -Republican and Speaker of the House of Representatives Paul Ryan tweeted:

The Paris deal commits countries to holding global temperature rises to “well below” 2C above pre-industrial levels, which will require emissions to be cut to net zero by the second half of the century.

Scientists have warned failure to curb dangerous climate change will lead to sea level rises, more intense storms and flooding, more extreme droughts, water shortages and heatwaves as well as massive loss of wildlife and reduction in crop yields, potentially sparking conflict and mass migration.

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