Tuesday 6 December 2016

Interpol probes woods boy mystery

Published 17/09/2011 | 10:41

The Foreign Office is looking into reports of an English-speaking teenager who says he lived in woods in Germany for five years
The Foreign Office is looking into reports of an English-speaking teenager who says he lived in woods in Germany for five years

Interpol, the world's largest police organisation, is investigating whether a teenager who emerged in Berlin saying he had been living in the woods for five years is listed as a missing British child.

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The 17-year-old, called Ray, appeared at Berlin's city hall on September 5 and was taken in by a youth emergency centre after explaining that his father had died two weeks earlier and he had buried him in the woods.

The boy, who says he does not remember where his family came from, said he followed his compass north to reach the city.

Police chiefs said they have approached Interpol to see if the boy matches any missing person reports. Officers will not know the results of the inquiry until Monday.

Claudia Elitok, of Berlin police, said: "He speaks fluent English and a few words in German. He remembers his name but we are not releasing it.

"He explained that the last five years were spent in the woods with his father, then his father died and he buried him. He was walking for two weeks before getting to Berlin.

"He has said what happened to his mother but I can't go into that information. He was found in good condition and is being taken care of by officials."

Detectives are going over everything Ray has told them to establish a picture of his background and biography. It is not known if he will accompany police to the spot where he left his father and began his journey to the capital.

A spokeswoman for the Foreign Office said: "We are aware of these reports and we are looking into them."

It is thought consular staff could begin liaising with the authorities in Berlin on Monday if the teenager proves to be British.

Press Association

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