Wednesday 26 April 2017

Children 'copy junk food ploys'

Children use the same psychological ploys as adults to justify eating junk food, research has shown
Children use the same psychological ploys as adults to justify eating junk food, research has shown

Children use the same ploys as adults to justify eating junk food, research has shown.

According to the new study, the use of Compensatory Health Beliefs (CHBs) - justifying doing something unhealthy by saying you plan to make up for it later - by primary school children could be contributing to increasing obesity levels.

University of Derby doctorate student Atiya Kamal said it is widely accepted that adults use CHBs but she carried out a study to see if children have them too.

"Have you ever thought: 'I can eat that chocolate cake because I am going to the gym later'?" the 28-year-old said.

"That is an example of a Compensatory Health Belief. These types of beliefs can damage efforts to maintain or lose weight if individuals then don't actually get to the gym.

"It is widely accepted that many adults hold these types of beliefs, and I wanted to find out if children also have them, and if they might contribute to childhood obesity levels. My research suggests this is indeed the case, and work must be done to address the issue and combat these beliefs among children."

Miss Kamal said the influence of CHBs could be contributing to a rise in UK obesity levels despite initiatives to promote healthy eating and exercise.

For her doctorate study Miss Kamal, supervised by University of Derby psychology lecturer Dr Vicki Staples, interviewed around 100 five to 10-year-olds in primary school education about their diet and activities, and how they linked to CHBs.

Findings of her study, entitled "Do children hold Compensatory Health Beliefs?: an exploratory study", suggest children do hold CHBs in areas including physical activity, media-related activities, a high fat and high sugar diet, oral health and sleep.

One six-year-old girl who took part told her it was acceptable to watch television for a long time because: "I go out, run around, go back in and watch TV again." a boy, aged nine, said eating unhealthily if he did exercise was okay "because you're cancelling out the bad".

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