Monday 24 July 2017

Boozy baboons raid SA vineyards

Baboons, it seems, prefer pinot noir. They also like a nice chardonnay
Baboons, it seems, prefer pinot noir. They also like a nice chardonnay

Baboons, it seems, prefer pinot noir. They also like a nice chardonnay.

Largely undeterred by electric fences, hundreds of wild baboons in South Africa's prized wine country are finding the vineyards of ripe, succulent grapes to be an "absolute bonanza", said Justin O'Riain, of the University of Cape Town.

Winemakers have resorted to using noise-makers and rubber snakes to try to drive the baboons off during harvest season.

"The poor baboons are driven to distraction," said Mr O'Riain, who works in the university's Baboon Research Unit.

"As far as baboons are concerned, the combination of starch and sugar is very attractive - and that's your basic grape," he said.

Growers say the picky primates are partial to sweet pinot noir grapes, adding to the winemakers' woe. Pinot noir sells for more than the average merlot or cabernet sauvignon.

"They choose the nicest bunches, and you will see the ones they leave on the ground. If you taste them, they are sour," said Francois van Vuuren, farm manager at La Terra de Luc vineyards, 50 miles (80km) east of Cape Town. "They eat the sweetest ones and leave the rest."

Baboons have raided South Africa's vineyards in the past, but farmers say this year is worse than previous ones because the primates have lost their usual foraging areas due to wildfires and ongoing expansion of grape-growing areas.

Press Association

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