Sunday 23 July 2017

Bid to protect Yorkshire puddings

Top chef Brian Turner with a platter of British Beef that is heading for Brussels from Waterloo Station, London, for a lunch hosted by the Meat and Livestock Commission. The Commission are putting British beef back on the menu after the three year ban. 11/3/04: School cooks from around the country were vying for the accolade of chef of the year. The eight finalists competing for the title in Birmingham will have to produce a nutritious two-course meal for just 80p. The judging panel includes Ready Steady Cook star Brian Turner and two pupils who take school meals.
Top chef Brian Turner with a platter of British Beef that is heading for Brussels from Waterloo Station, London, for a lunch hosted by the Meat and Livestock Commission. The Commission are putting British beef back on the menu after the three year ban. 11/3/04: School cooks from around the country were vying for the accolade of chef of the year. The eight finalists competing for the title in Birmingham will have to produce a nutritious two-course meal for just 80p. The judging panel includes Ready Steady Cook star Brian Turner and two pupils who take school meals.

Yorkshire pudding makers could win the same special protection afforded to Champagne and Parma ham producers to stop rivals from outside the county cashing in on the famous name, a regional food group said.

The Sunday roast favourite could win European rights, meaning they must be made within Yorkshire or Humberside if they are to be labelled as such.

Three manufacturers - including the popular Aunt Bessie brand - were in talks about applying for the special status.

The application was backed by the Regional Food Group for Yorkshire and Humber, which believes a centuries-old recipe could hold the key to a successful bid.

Sarah Knapper, the group's research and development director, said Yorkshire puddings were first named in an 18th-century recipe by food writer Hannah Glasse, and that her puddings differed from other similar dishes.

Winning special protection would benefit Yorkshire producers and boost sales, Ms Knapper said.

News of the bid came days after rhubarb producers in the county won similar special status.

Ms Knapper said: "It would prevent people anywhere else in the world from making it and calling it Yorkshire pudding."

She said restaurants from elsewhere in the country offering a Sunday roast might have to refer to Yorkshire-style puddings on their menus.

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