Tuesday 26 September 2017

Australian judge presides over Australian trial in a London courtroom

A hearing of the Supreme Court of New South Wales is being held in Court 64 at the Royal Courts of Justice
A hearing of the Supreme Court of New South Wales is being held in Court 64 at the Royal Courts of Justice

An Australian judge is presiding over an Australian trial in an Australian court - in London.

Judge Ian Harrison has begun analysing evidence in a civil dispute involving a British jockey badly hurt in a race in New South Wales at a hearing of the Supreme Court of New South Wales - in Court 64 at the Royal Courts of Justice.

Lawyers said a courtroom had been provided so that the judge could spend three weeks hearing evidence from British-based witnesses.

They said the trial would continue in Sydney - where the Supreme Court of New South Wales is based - later in the year.

The case features on lists of hearings at the Royal Courts of Justice and on lists available on the Supreme Court of New South Wales website.

Judge Harrison heard that jockey Paul Goode had suffered "catastrophic" spinal injuries when he fell during a race at Queanbeyan, New South Wales, in 2009.

He claims that another rider - Tye Angland - caused the fall.

Lawyers said Mr Goode was claiming around £5 million damages.

Mr Angland disputes Mr Goode's claim.

The judge is expected to analyse evidence about the fall from Mr Goode during the hearing in London.

Mr Goode, 37, who comes from Windsor, Berkshire, but lives near Northallerton, North Yorkshire, was at today's hearing.

He sat in a wheelchair at the front of the court.

Mr Angland was not at the hearing.

Judge Harrison was today given an outline of the case by barrister Tony Bartley, for Mr Goode.

The hearing continues tomorrow.

Press Association

Editors Choice

Also in World News