Sunday 22 January 2017

Teen boy (15) discovers ancient lost Mayan city - without leaving his bedroom

Published 11/05/2016 | 13:09

William Gadoury (Credit: The National)
William Gadoury (Credit: The National)

A 15-year-old boy has discovered a lost city of the Maya civilisation - something that’s been hidden from archaeologists for centuries.

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William Gadoury found ruins the buried deep in the Yucatan jungle of south-eastern Mexico

The Canadian student managed to figure out the location after he realised that the ancient cities were built in alignment with the stars. 

“I was really surprised and excited when I realised that the most brilliant stars of the constellations matched the largest Maya cities,” William told the Journal de Montréal.

Map indicating where Mayan city would be (Credit: The National)
Map indicating where Mayan city would be (Credit: The National)

He studied 22 constellations for hours in his bedroom and discovered that they were linked to Mayan cities across Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. 

When looking at a 23rd constellation he found that one star was not matched with any civilisation and used Google maps to predict a hidden city in the dense forest of Mexico. 

The Canadian Space Agency began to research the area and returned with striking images of a Mayan pyramid and several smaller structures. 

If the satellite photographs are verified, the city would be among the largest Mayan population centres ever discovered.

William took to Google Maps and found that there must be another city hidden in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico Credit: CSA
William took to Google Maps and found that there must be another city hidden in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico Credit: CSA

Yucatan Expat Life said: "Not only has he discovered a new Maya city, but it is one of the five largest on record."

William named the new city ‘K’aak Chi’, which means ‘Fire Mouth’ and hopes one day to be able to visit the ruins. 

The location is in a remote area of Mexico and an archaeological mission would be very expensive. 

"It's always about money. Expedition costs are horribly expensive,” said Dr. Armand LaRocque, a specialist at the University of New Brunswick.

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