Friday 9 December 2016

Sister of Charleston 'gunman' fundraises for wedding costs after 'perfect day' was ruined following black church massacre

Published 03/07/2015 | 07:54

Credit: GoFundMe screengrab
Credit: GoFundMe screengrab

The sister of the man responsible for killing nine people in a black church last month launched an online campaign to raise funds for her rescheduled nuptials.

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Amber Roof's brother Dylan was the gunman who stands accused of shooting dead the community leaders during a bible session at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in South Carolina.

Ms Roof maintains the tragedy forced her to cancel her planned wedding - and set up a GoFundMe page in order to raise money for "wedding costs, to pay bills, and to send us on our dream honeymoon".

In her public plea on the crowdfunding site, she said that "money cannot replace the wedding we lost and our perfect day" due to the Charlestown tragedy.

"Dear Family & Friends, 

"As many of you know Michael and I had to abruptly cancel our wedding day, due to the tragedy that occurred in Charleston. June 21st was supposed to be the happiest day of our lives.

Dylann Roof is said to have held racist views and had two recent run-ins with police (Charleston County Sheriff's Office/AP)
Dylann Roof is said to have held racist views and had two recent run-ins with police (Charleston County Sheriff's Office/AP)
Police lead suspected shooter Dylann Roof, 21, into the courthouse in Shelby, North Carolina, June 18, 2015
CCTV footage shows Dylann Roof entering the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston Photo: Reuters
Massacre: Dylann Storm Roof

"It is the day every girl dreams of, it was the day we dreamed of. We had each other, we have the perfect venue, and we had our vows ready to be read.

"We were ready! We had planned out every detail for months and months. It was going to be the PERFECT day! 

Our wedding day was supposed to be the most important and special day of our lives.

"It was supposed to start our lives together with our new family. Our day was the exact opposite. Our wedding day was full of sorrow, pain, and shame, tainted by the actions of one man. "

Charleston residents Darby Jenkins (R) and his mother Ashley, look for a spot to leave flowers for the victims of Wednesday's shootings, near a police barricade in Charleston, South Carolina June 18, 2015. Police in Charleston were searching for a white gunman on Thursday who killed nine people in a historic African-American church, in an attack that police and the city's mayor described as a hate crime. REUTERS/Randall Hill
Charleston residents Darby Jenkins (R) and his mother Ashley, look for a spot to leave flowers for the victims of Wednesday's shootings, near a police barricade in Charleston, South Carolina June 18, 2015. Police in Charleston were searching for a white gunman on Thursday who killed nine people in a historic African-American church, in an attack that police and the city's mayor described as a hate crime. REUTERS/Randall Hill
Charleston police man a barricade behind the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, June 18, 2015. Police in Charleston were searching for a white gunman on Thursday who killed nine people in a historic African-American church, in an attack that police and the city's mayor described as a hate crime. Also pictured are residents' vehicles which are seen stuck in the cordon during investigation. REUTERS/Randall Hill
Charleston residents Darby Jenkins (L) and his mother Ashley, leave flowers for the victims of Wednesday's shootings, near a police barricade in Charleston, South Carolina, June 18, 2015. Police in Charleston were searching for a white gunman on Thursday who killed nine people in a historic African-American church, in an attack that police and the city's mayor described as a hate crime. REUTERS/Randall Hill
Police respond to a shooting at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina June 17, 2015. A gunman opened fire on Wednesday evening at the historic African-American church in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, and was still at large, a U.S. police official said. REUTERS/Randall Hill
A small prayer circle forms nearby where police are responding to a shooting at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina June 17, 2015. A gunman opened fire on Wednesday evening at the historic African-American church in downtown Charleston, a U.S. police official said. REUTERS/Randall Hill
Police respond to a shooting at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, June 17, 2015. A gunman opened fire on Wednesday evening at the historic African-American church in downtown Charleston. REUTERS/Randall Hill
Police vehicles are seen at the street of the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, June 18, 2015. Police in Charleston were searching for a white gunman on Thursday who killed nine people in a historic African-American church, in an attack that police and the city's mayor described as a hate crime. REUTERS/Randall Hill
A car which police believe belongs to a suspect which police are searching for in connection with the shooting of several people at a church in Charleston, South Carolina is seen in a still image from CCTV footage released by the Charleston Police Department June 18, 2015. A white gunman was still at large after killing nine people during a prayer service at an historic African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina, the city's police chief said on Thursday, describing the attack as a hate crime. REUTERS/Charleston Police Department/Handout via Reuters ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
A man reacts while talking to police officer near the scene of shooting at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, June 17, 2015. A gunman opened fire on Wednesday evening at the historic African-American church in downtown Charleston, South Carolina. REUTERS/Randall Hill

The Charleston Massacre took place and our lives were forever changed. The media abused our privacy and published all of our wedding information and destroyed our dream day. Destroying the first day of Michael and my life together ..."

Read more: Charleston officer fired for posing in Confederate boxers days after nine shot dead in black church

The page attracted a number of negative attention before the "self-centred and insensitive" fundraising page was removed on Thursday.

"“I can’t imagine the anguish and sorrow that your own brother has inflicted on so many wonderful and kind people and all the while, you are fantasising about letting others fund your honeymoon!!,” she wrote.

Despite this, the campaign raised just over $1,600 before the page was closed "by the campaign organiser.

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