Monday 26 September 2016

Oregon shooting: Hero veteran shot seven times charging at gunman who idolised IRA

Nine people have died after alleged shooter Chris Harper-Mercer opened fire in the school

Rose Troup Buchanan and Agencies

Published 02/10/2015 | 16:31

Chris Mintz was shot 'several' times during the attack, family members said Chris Mintz, via Facebook
Chris Mintz was shot 'several' times during the attack, family members said Chris Mintz, via Facebook
Chris Harper Mercer who has been identified by US media as the gunman in Oregon shooting in which at least nine people died and dozens more were wounded
Kristen Sterner, left, and Carrissa Welding, students of Umpqua Community College, embrace each other during a vigil for those killed at the college (AP)
A woman is comforted after a shooting at Umpqua Community College (AP)
Friends and family wait for students at the local fairgrounds after the deadly shooting at Umpqua Community College (AP)
President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the shooting, in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House (AP)

AN ARMY veteran has been hailed a hero after he reportedly charged a gunman in an attempt to save lives during the latest school shooting in the US.

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Chris Mintz, 30, was taken to hospital after he was shot up to seven times by the gunman during the attack on Umpqua Community College in Oregon on Thursday morning.

Cousin Derek Bourgeois confirmed he had heard Mr Mintz “went after the shooter”.

“There was no way he was going to stand around and watch something this horrific happen,” he told the MailOnline.

Read more: Oregon shooting: Troubled gunman was carrying six guns and wearing body armour

Having left the army, where he had been stationed in Fort Lewis in Washington state, Mr Mintz was apparently working at the YMCA while studying at the community college to become a fitness instructor.

People take part in candle light vigil following a mass shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola
People take part in candle light vigil following a mass shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

An unidentified nurse, who claimed to have witnessed the attack and prayed with Mr Mintz after he was wounded, said during the attack he kept repeating: “It’s my son’s birthday, it’s my son’s birthday”.

Read more: 'Deeply distressing' Oregon school killer was 'influenced by IRA images' - Justice Minister

Earlier in the day Mr Mintz posted a birthday message to his young son, Tyrik, online.

Family members claimed the father-of-one will need extensive rehabilitation, with some reports indicating he may have to learn to walk again after being hit in both legs.

Umpqua Community College interim president Rita Cavin speaks to the media after a mass shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola
Umpqua Community College interim president Rita Cavin speaks to the media after a mass shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon October 1, 2015. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola

The Oregon sheriff investigating the execution-style killing of at least nine people in a college classroom refused to identify the suspect on Friday, saying he wanted to deny the shooter notoriety, the ultimate prize he sought in the bloodshed.

A day after the shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, residents of the quiet former timber town struggled to comprehend the deadliest mass killing this year in the United States. The gunman also wounded seven people in the rampage and died in an exchange of gunfire with police.

Law enforcement sources confirmed reports identifying the suspect as Chris Harper-Mercer, 26, who lived with his mother in nearby Winchester.

It has emerged English born Harper-Mercer had an ‘Ireland Freedom Fighters’ album on his MySpace page.

Among his social media profiles was other content linked to the IRA.

In a blog post linked to him, Harper-Mercer said he relished the headlines garnered by Vester Flanagan, the man who shot dead two reporters during a live broadcast in Virginia in August before killing himself.

"A man who was known by no one, is now known by everyone ... Seems the more people you kill, the more you're in the limelight," the post read.

Read more: Obama says US 'has become numb' to mass shootings

In a highly unusual step, Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin vowed never to utter the gunman's name and said he would let the coroner identify the gunman.

"I don't want to glorify his name. I don't want to glorify his cause," Hanlin, an outspoken defender of gun ownership, told CNN.

The gunman stormed into a classroom at the college that serves mostly older students in career transitions, shot a professor at point-blank range, then ordered cowering students to stand up and state their religion before he shot them one by one, according to survivors' accounts.

Oregon Governor Kate Brown declined in television interviews on Friday morning to discuss gun control, as did the sheriff, and said it was a time for healing the community.

A month after the December 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut, Hanlin wrote a letter to Vice President Joe Biden that defended the right to bear arms, protected by the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

"Gun control is NOT the answer to preventing heinous crimes like school shootings," Hanlin wrote in the letter, dated Jan. 15, 2013.

Just hours after Thursday's shooting, a visibly angry President Barack Obama urged Americans to press their elected leaders to enact tougher firearms safety laws.

"Somehow this has become routine. The reporting is routine. My response here, at this podium, ends up being routine," he said. "We've become numb to this."

In a photo posted on what was believed to be the suspected gunman's MySpace profile, a young man with a shaved head and dark-rimmed eyeglasses stares into the camera while holding a rifle.

A man identifying himself as Ian Mercer, the gunman's father, told reporters outside his home in Los Angeles on Thursday night, "It's been a devastating day, devastating for me and my family."

Authorities offered no motive for the shooting. Hanlin said local homicide detectives and federal agents were conducting an investigation.

Not counting Thursday's incident, 293 mass shootings have been reported this year, according to the Mass Shooting Tracker website, a crowd-sourced database kept by anti-gun activists that logs events in which four or more people are shot.

Independent News Service

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