Wednesday 26 July 2017

Hillary: Trump is 'dangerous and unfit to be US president'

Hillary Clinton delivers a speech on national security in San Diego, California
Hillary Clinton delivers a speech on national security in San Diego, California
Donald Trump

Nick Allen Washington

Hillary Clinton has unveiled what will be a key plank of her presidential election campaign - warning that the world will be "less safe" if Donald Trump becomes president.

In a major speech on foreign policy, Ms Clinton unleashed a scathing attack, accusing Mr Trump of being "dangerous and unfit to be president".

She lambasted the billionaire for undermining relationships with European allies, supporting nuclear proliferation, and being too friendly to North Korea.

Advisers to Ms Clinton said it was the start of a sustained attack in which the former secretary of state would contrast her international experience with her rival's lack of it.

In his "America First" foreign policy, Mr Trump has criticised Nato as obsolete and too costly for the United States, suggested Japan and North Korea should have nuclear weapons, pledged to ban foreign Muslims from the United States and said he would sit down with Kim Jong-un.

Jake Sullivan, Ms Clinton's foreign policy adviser, said she was determined to "rebuke a litany of dangerous policies that Trump has espoused, ranging from nuclear proliferation to endorsing war crimes, from denouncing Nato to banning Muslims".

Donald Trump
Donald Trump

Mr Sullivan added: "It is not just about Republican versus Democrat.

"Donald Trump is unlike any presidential nominee we've seen in modern times and he is fundamentally unfit for the job."

Meanwhile, the top elected Republican, Paul Ryan, ended a long period of soul-searching and endorsed Trump for president last night, a step toward unifying party loyalists behind the divisive candidate.

Mr Ryan, the House of Representatives speaker, had been a high-profile hold-out against supporting Trump for the November 8 presidential election out of concern about the presumptive Republican nominee's bellicose rhetoric and his break with party orthodoxy on issues including trade and immigration (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Irish Independent

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