Friday 2 December 2016

Hillary goes after big bucks in battle with Bush

Peter Foster in Washington

Published 08/05/2015 | 02:30

Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton signs a button after taking part in a roundtable of young Nevadans discussing immigration, as she campaigns for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, at Rancho High School in Las Vegas, Nevada. Photo: Reuters
Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton signs a button after taking part in a roundtable of young Nevadans discussing immigration, as she campaigns for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, at Rancho High School in Las Vegas, Nevada. Photo: Reuters

Hillary Clinton has embarked on a fundraising drive with high-dollar donors after her campaign admitted she was embracing the system of big-money political fundraising that she has previously openly derided.

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Mrs Clinton, the front-runner for the Democrat nomination, is to appear at events for so-called Super PACs, the outside interest-groups that have been free to raise hundreds of millions of dollars for individual political candidates.

The decision by the Clinton campaign to work directly with the leading Democrat Super PAC, Priorities USA Action, comes amid reports that Jeb Bush, her possible Republican opponent, is breaking fundraising records.

Republicans – who have outstripped Democrats in the use of Super PACs – immediately attacked Mrs Clinton, accusing her of double standards. Jeff Bechdel, a spokesman for the conservative group America Rising PAC, said: “Clinton’s hypocrisy knows no bounds”.

The first round of Clinton meetings took place on a three-day fundraising swing through California, according to reports in both the ‘Wall Street Journal’ and the ‘New York Times’, which said that Mrs Clinton had met with a number of top Priorities USA donors.

Among those were Tom Steyer, the billionaire hedge fund activist, who has a strong green agenda and is a long-time donor to the Clintons.

Mr Steyer hosted over 100 potential donors at his San Francisco home to listen to Mrs Clinton talk about the economy and strengthening the middle classes, the ‘Wall Street Journal’ reported, with further meetings planned for Los Angeles. Mrs Clinton’s change of heart on PACs came despite her striking a populist economic tone in early campaign events, attacking chief executives’ pay and the Super PAC system which enables special interest groups to circumvent the $2,700-per campaign limits on individual donors.

“We need to fix our dysfunctional political system and get unaccountable money out of it once and for all, even if it takes a constitutional amendment,” Mrs Clinton said on a visit to Iowa last month. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Telegraph.co.uk

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