Wednesday 7 December 2016

Hearse that carried body of John F Kennedy to be auctioned

Amy Willis

Published 20/12/2011 | 09:15

The 1960's Cadillac hearse used to carry the body of President John F. Kennedy from a Dallas hospital to Air Force Once on Nov. 22, 1963. Photo: AP
The 1960's Cadillac hearse used to carry the body of President John F. Kennedy from a Dallas hospital to Air Force Once on Nov. 22, 1963. Photo: AP

THE hearse that carried the body of assassinated US President John F Kennedy is set to go on sale at an auction early next year.

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The white 1960s Cadillac transported the former president's bronze casket from Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas to Air Force One in Love Field. First Lady Jackie Kennedy also rode in the vehicle for the trip.



President Kennedy's body was then flown back to Washington DC.



John F Kennedy was hit by a sniper bullet as his motorcade passed through Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963. At only 43, he was the youngest elected president to serve in the White House at the time.



Former US Marine Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested for the killing, but never made it to court after nightclub owner Jack Ruby shot him dead as he was transferred to the county jail.



The auction of the classic car will be held on January 21, 2012, in Scottsdale, Arizona, auctioneers Barrett-Jackson said.



The car was built by Miller-Meteor and sold to the O'Neal Funeral Home in Dallas just a few weeks before the assassination. Employee Arrdeen Vaughan bought the car from the funeral home in the late 1960s and sold the vehicle privately four decades later.



"It's an honour to be able to offer a vehicle of this stature," a spokesman for the auctioneers said. "While its duty was solemn, it was also extremely important and played a crucial role in transporting the president so he could be laid to rest."



Earlier this year, Barrett-Jackson auctioned the ambulance used to carry the president's body from Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base to the Bethesda Naval Hospital. The ambulance sold for $132,000 despite scepticism over its authenticity.



Telegraph.co.uk

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