Wednesday 7 December 2016

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg calls for love and empathy to combat terror attacks

Kate Ferguson

Published 28/03/2016 | 19:43

People gather at a street memorial in Brussels following the bombings in Brussels
People gather at a street memorial in Brussels following the bombings in Brussels
A couple embrace in front of tributes placed in a memorial for victims of the recent attacks on Brussels at the Place de la Bourse in Brussels.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has spoken out against the "fear and distrust" spread by the recent wave of terror attacks - and called for love and empathy to combat them.

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The tech entrepreneur said atrocities in Belgium, Pakistan and Turkey were all designed to sow seeds of hatred between different communities.

Writing on his Facebook page, he wrote: "Each of these attacks was different, but all had a common thread: they were carried out with a goal to spread fear and distrust, and turn members of a community against each other.

"I believe the only sustainable way to fight back against those who seek to divide us is to create a world where understanding and empathy can spread faster than hate, and where every single person in every country feels connected and cared for and loved.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg

"That's the world we can and must build together."

At least 70 people were killed and 300 injured when a Taliban splinter group detonated a bomb in a park while children were playing on Easter Sunday.

The militants said they deliberately targeted the Christian community in the attack, launched on the holiest day of the Christian calendar.

It came after atrocities in Brussels in Belgium and Ankara in Turkey, killing dozens more.

A couple embrace in front of tributes placed in a memorial for victims of the recent attacks on Brussels at the Place de la Bourse in Brussels.
A couple embrace in front of tributes placed in a memorial for victims of the recent attacks on Brussels at the Place de la Bourse in Brussels.

Facebook has been criticised for mistakenly asking users hundreds of miles away from the bombing in Lahore, Pakistan, if they were safe.

Explaining the reasoning behind this new safety check, Mr Zuckerberg added: "Over the last two months, we have activated Safety Check several times for acts of terror - including in Turkey and Belgium - so people in the area can let their friends and loved ones know they're safe."

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