Thursday 29 September 2016

Ancient lost Mayan city discovery found by teen boy (15) may just be a field

Published 12/05/2016 | 10:43

William Gadoury (Credit: The National)
William Gadoury (Credit: The National)

Doubts have been cast over a 15-year-old boy's discovery of a lost city of the Maya civilisation, hidden from archaeologists for centuries.

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William Gadoury shot to fame this week amid claims he found the ancient ruins buried deep in the Yucatan jungle of south-eastern Mexico.

The Canadian student said he managed to figure out the location after he realised that the ancient cities were built in alignment with the stars. 

“I was really surprised and excited when I realised that the most brilliant stars of the constellations matched the largest Maya cities,” William told the Journal de Montréal.

Map indicating where Mayan city would be (Credit: The National)
Map indicating where Mayan city would be (Credit: The National)

However, now experts are expressing their scepticism over the 'discovery', citing 'junk science' and 'internet in free-fall'.

Read more: Teen boy (15) discovers ancient lost Mayan city - without leaving his bedroom

"The whole thing is a mess - a terrible example of junk science hitting the internet in free-fall. The ancient Maya didn't plot their ancient cities according to constellations," one expert David Stuart said.

Goudery said he 22 constellations for hours in his bedroom and found that they were linked to Mayan cities across Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. 

William took to Google Maps and found that there must be another city hidden in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico Credit: CSA
William took to Google Maps and found that there must be another city hidden in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico Credit: CSA

When looking at a 23rd constellation he found that one star was not matched with any civilisation and used Google maps to predict a hidden city in the dense forest of Mexico. 

The Canadian Space Agency began to research the area and returned with striking images of a Mayan pyramid and several smaller structures.

Goudery received some help from Dr. Armand LaRocque, a research associate at the University of New Brunswick’s sensing laboratory. in his research.

LaRocque is now reported to have said that much more research is in fact required to confirm whether the location is in fact the site of a lost city. 

If the satellite photographs are verified, the city would be among the largest Mayan population centres ever discovered.

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