Tuesday 17 October 2017

Afghan war will end only when Nato leaves, says Taliban leader

Maulvi Haibatullah Akhunzadah vowed to fight on until a full withdrawal of Nato troops (Afghan Islamic Press via AP)
Maulvi Haibatullah Akhunzadah vowed to fight on until a full withdrawal of Nato troops (Afghan Islamic Press via AP)

The leader of the Afghan Taliban has said that a planned US troop surge will not end the protracted war in the country and vowed to fight on until a full withdrawal of Nato troops.

The remarks by Maulvi Haibatullah Akhunzadah came in a message ahead of the Muslim holiday of Eid al Fitr, which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan - something the Taliban does every year to rally followers.

It also followed a horrific suicide car bombing claimed by the Taliban in Afghanistan's Helmand province that targeted Afghan troops and government workers waiting to collect their pay ahead of the holiday.

By Friday, the death toll from that attack rose to 34 people, most of them civilians, provincial government spokesman Omar Zwak said.

In the Taliban message this year, the militant leader seemed to harden his stance, saying the Afghan government is too corrupt to stay on and warning of another civil war in Kabul - along the lines of the 1992 fighting when mujahedeen groups threw out the Communist government in Afghanistan and turned their guns on each other.

That conflict killed more than 50,000 civilians and gave rise to the Taliban.

The Taliban said it is waging war against the Kabul government and not targeting civilians.

In its claim of the Helmand attack, it insisted no civilians died.

Mr Zwak, however, said most of the dead in the attack in the provincial capital, Lashkar Gah, were civilians, although there were soldiers inside the bank at the time of the explosion.

Witnesses said children were among the dozens wounded.

The defence ministry has urged soldiers to collect their salaries from banks located inside army bases.

If they do go to banks elsewhere, they should refrain from wearing their uniforms, the ministry's deputy spokesman Mohammad Radmanish said.

Outside a hospital in Lashkar Gah, Esmatullah Khan, 34, said he had donated blood to help some of the nearly 70 wounded in the attack.

Akhunzadah, the Taliban leader, also boasted of allegedly growing international support, saying "mainstream entities of the world admit (the Taliban) effectiveness, legitimacy and success", an apparent reference to reports of overtures by Russia and China to the Taliban amid concerns of an emerging Islamic State affiliate in Afghanistan.

While the IS affiliate's stronghold is in eastern Afghanistan's Nangarhar province, the branch has also managed to stage high-profile attacks in Kabul and other cities.

The presence of battle-hardened Uzbek militants in the ranks also further worries Moscow.

After urging Afghans to embrace holy war, or jihad, to oust foreign troops, Akhunzadah's rambling message went on to touch upon the conflict between Gulf Arab states and Qatar, saying he was "saddened" by the feud.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt have accused Qatar of supporting extremists, a charge that Doha denies.

AP

Press Association

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