Thursday 21 September 2017

€10m psalm book

A tiny book of psalms from 1640 has sold for £8.7m (€10.4m) in New York, setting an auction record for a printed book.

The Bay Psalm Book is believed to be the first book printed in what is now the United States. Only 11 copies survive in varying degrees of completeness and the one sold was one of two copies held by Boston's Old South Church.

DEAR DIPLODOCUS

A giant skeleton of a dinosaur which last roamed Earth more than 150 million years ago has fetched £400,000 (€480,000) at auction.

The 55ft specimen of the long-necked Diplodocus longus went under the hammer in Billingshurst, West Sussex.

NUCLEAR GROWHOUSE

A subterranean cannabis farm has been found hidden inside a network of tunnels used as a nuclear bunker during the Cold War.

Around £650,000 (€780,000)-worth of cannabis was found growing in the historic Drakelow Tunnels near Kidderminster, Worcestershire.

VERDICT MUSIC TO EARS

A concert pianist has been cleared of charges of causing noise pollution, which could have sent her to jail, by a Spanish court.

Laia Martin (28), and her parents, were all found not guilty after their trial earlier this month caused a storm of ridicule and disbelief when prosecutors sought a sentence of seven years. They later reduced this to 20 months.

BBQS UP IN SMOKE

Beijing is waging a war against air pollution one barbecue at a time. Municipal authorities have destroyed more than 500 open-air barbecues to cut down the tiny particulate matter they create.

Beijing's district administration bureau said the hundreds of barbecue grills were confiscated over a three-month campaign and cut up so they could not be used again.

DNA TRACKS DOG DIRT

Apartment managers in Massachusetts are turning to DNA testing to identity the dog owners who do not clean up after their pets.

The dog mess is analysed and matched to records to show which dog caused it to keep waste off hallways, lifts and other common areas. DNA monitoring has yielded immediate and dramatic results in the condominium community of Devon Wood, where maintenance staff previously reported several piles of droppings each week.

Irish Independent

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