News Weather

Tuesday 26 September 2017

Thunderstorms and downpours make the weekend a washout across the country

Chase Reynolds (3) and his brother Sean (5), from Cabra, play with the autumn leaves in the Phoenix Park. Picture by Fergal Phillips
Chase Reynolds (3) and his brother Sean (5), from Cabra, play with the autumn leaves in the Phoenix Park. Picture by Fergal Phillips

Patrick Kelleher

It was a weekend washout as torrential downpours and strong gusts of winds swept across the country.

Unfortunately, more heavy rainclouds and thunderstorms are gathering on the horizon.

Alva McDermot and Peter Mannion take a selfie at Bull Island in Dublin yesterday. Picture by Fergal Phillips
Alva McDermot and Peter Mannion take a selfie at Bull Island in Dublin yesterday. Picture by Fergal Phillips

According to Met Éireann, the bad weather will not let up until tomorrow, when it will start to settle.

There will be drier conditions from the middle of the week onwards.

Sadly, however, conditions will become unsettled again as next weekend approaches.

Showers today will be at their heaviest in western and northern areas, with moderate winds from a westerly direction.

A man emerges from the sea after kitesurfing in Bull Island. Picture by Fergal Phillips
A man emerges from the sea after kitesurfing in Bull Island. Picture by Fergal Phillips

Temperatures will remain relatively high at between 12-14 degrees Celsius.

The temperatures are at the upper end of the average temperatures at this time of year. This humidity could result in thunderstorms.

It comes after a weekend of heavy rain and strong winds.

A yellow-status weather alert was in place for most of the weekend for heavy rainfall. However, it has since been lifted.

The alert was for Wexford, Wicklow, Cork and Waterford. It included a risk of spot flooding.

Rain primarily fell overnight, so most flooding cleared before drivers took to the roads.

Another yellow alert was issued yesterday for small sailing crafts due to southerly winds out at sea, that will reach force six or more.

A spokesperson for AA Roadwatch said road conditions should be manageable for motorists.

However, the AA also reiterated the need for drivers to approach the roads with caution as rain and thunder are set to continue into tomorrow.

"People need to be extra-vigilant - make sure they've checked their tyres, their window wipers are perfectly functioning," an AA spokesperson told the Irish Independent.

"Make sure they're road-ready and they're ready to deal with the wet conditions once they get out there."

They also advised that motorists should be careful of any spot flooding and to never drive through water that may cause damage to their car or pose a safety risk.

"Slow down and allow plenty of time to reach your destination," she said.

Fog is likely to form on Wednesday night but will lift on Thursday morning.

The wet weather comes as the country braces itself for seasonal floods.

Flooding routinely hits Ireland between October and January each year, with some areas being worse hit than others. Places that are worst hit by flooding include Cork, counties in the West, such as Galway and Mayo, and parts of Dublin.

Met Éireann will hold a public lecture this Thursday in Custom House in Dublin, at which it will address the challenges caused by flooding. It will be given by Gerry O'Connell, Owen McManus and Tony Maguire, current and retired engineers with Dublin City Council.

They will talk about managing the risk of flooding in the capital as the flooding season rapidly approaches.

Irish Independent

Also in this section