Saturday 10 December 2016

September sizzler breaks records ... but all good things must end

Published 29/09/2011 | 05:00

Jenny Stokes, Colleen Dobry and Leah Fritz, from the US,
and Jo Doyle and Eleanor Hutch, from Dalkey, reprised
their bikinis in Sandycove, Dublin
Jenny Stokes, Colleen Dobry and Leah Fritz, from the US, and Jo Doyle and Eleanor Hutch, from Dalkey, reprised their bikinis in Sandycove, Dublin
Three-year-old Ian Hession made the most of the unusually fine weather yesterday in Sandycove, Dublin

IT was a new record for late September -- but like all good things, the spell of hot and dry weather is coming to an end.

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Met Eireann is forecasting overcast skies, periods of rain and mist for the coming days as we kiss goodbye to the brief Indian summer.

Yesterday saw temperatures of 25.5C recorded at the climate station in the Phoenix Park, Dublin.

The temperature was the highest recorded in the final days of September at the station since scientists started gathering data there in 1881.

It also equalled the highest temperature recorded in the country over the entire summer.

"There have been higher temperatures recorded in early September, but this was the highest we've seen late in the month," Met Eireann's Pat Clarke said.

The good weather is due to high pressure and strong south-westerly winds.

"Wednesday was due to be the peak; it was hot almost everywhere in the country. It won't get that hot again," Mr Clarke said.

He added that while temperatures would continue to be above average for this time of year, periods of rain and mist were forecast up to the weekend.

Today will start off dull and damp with the possibility of rain in most parts of the country. The highest temperatures will be during the evening when it will hit the late teens with a possible high of 20C.

Temperatures will be much the same tomorrow, with more rain coming in from the west. Saturday and Sunday will also be rainy with the mercury reaching a low of between 6C and 8C.

"The (bad) weather that has been kept out by the high pressure will start to creep in," Mr Clarke said.

Irish Independent

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