Friday 2 December 2016

School's back and - so are blue skies and sunny spells

David Kearns

Published 30/08/2016 | 02:30

(L to r) Leah o Keefe, Kate Lynch & Kathleen Horgan all from Clare enjoying the good weather in St. Stephens Green, Dublin. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
(L to r) Leah o Keefe, Kate Lynch & Kathleen Horgan all from Clare enjoying the good weather in St. Stephens Green, Dublin. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

It turns out there's truth in the old wives tale that back-to-school blues and blissful weather go hand in hand, according to Met Éireann.

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Temperatures always appear to soar just as students pick up their back packs and head back to school.

Anick Sitruk from Holland enjoying the good weather in St. Stephens Green, Dublin. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Anick Sitruk from Holland enjoying the good weather in St. Stephens Green, Dublin. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

Met Éireann forecaster Joanne Donnelly says Irish weather is always at its best towards the end of August.

"Our weather comes off the Atlantic, and when it heats up Ireland just gets hotter and hotter," she said.

"The Atlantic begins to heat up during June and July, rising from around 14C to 16C, and it's around this time of year that it peaks.

"Water takes an awful lot longer to heat than land.

Alex Monedero from Capel St with her dog Millie enjoying the good weather in St. Stephens Green, Dublin. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Alex Monedero from Capel St with her dog Millie enjoying the good weather in St. Stephens Green, Dublin. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

"Just a change in temperature of one or two degrees has a big impact on our weather. It might seem that conditions get better when the kids go back to school, but nature doesn't know it's September.

"People might call it an Indian summer, but we really should just keep calling it summer because it's around this week that Ireland tends get the best weather."

Met Éireann was quick to laugh off reports that a hurricane might hit the west coast this weekend. "There's no fear that Hurricane Gaston, which is hovering over the Atlantic, will reach Ireland," said meteorologist Gerry Murphy.

"By the time any tropical storm hits us, the wind strength is totally dissipated."

Irish Independent

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