Friday 28 July 2017

THE THRILL FACTOR: Myles McWeeney

When a 93-year-old recluse is found brutally murdered and mutilated in an almost deserted West Cork village, Detective Inspector Carl McCadden, recently attached to a proposed new elite national homicide squad, is sent from Dublin to find her killer. Although Hannah Fraule ha

A Waste Of Shame

By Jim Lusby

Orion st£9.99

When a 93-year-old recluse is found brutally murdered and mutilated in an almost deserted West Cork village, Detective Inspector Carl McCadden, recently attached to a proposed new elite national homicide squad, is sent from Dublin to find her killer. Although Hannah Fraule has lived in the village for 40 years nobody has a clue about her past and the local garda superintendent has a couple of handy suspects and thinks the case is open and shut. McCadden doesn't think it's that simple at all, and finds his inquiries are met with hostility and threatened violence.

Patiently piecing together the strands of Hannah's life with the help of some memorable characters, including a black West Cork-based detective garda, McCadden finds that the reason for the old woman's death lies in the tangle of Republican politics back at the foundation of the State and that Hannah Fraule was not at all what she appeared to be.

DI McCadden, too independent and stubborn to fit easily into the garda command structure, is a terrific creation, growing in stature and interest with each outing.

Milo Devine

By Brendan Landers

Poolbeg £6.99

Milo Devine is a former garda turned private detective. When he's approached by a former colleague, the official driver for The Gaffer, Archie Cooley, the dangerous but charismatic leader of the opposition, Milo's inclined to turn down the job.

But The Gaffer wants his beautiful but wilful daughter Nuala found and, as Nuala is a former girlfriend, he reluctantly agrees and becomes involved in the very seamy underbelly of Irish politics.

When Milo finds Nuala she's as dead as a doornail and he's the chief suspect. A promising addition to the burgeoning Dublin PI trade association.

Silent Joe

By Jefferson Parker

Harper Collins st£9.99

Hideously scarred as a baby by an abusive father and rescued from an orphanage by Orange County Supervisor Will Trona, who makes him his right-hand man, 'Silent' Joe thinks he knows all the dark secrets his politician par excellence adopted father uses to run the county. But when Will is brutally murdered before his eyes in a well-planned ambush he realises he really only knew the half of it. The traumatic and unhappy past he thought he'd buried comes back to haunt him as he tries to solve the killing, and, as the violence escalates, everything he's held dear is threatened.

Utterly absorbing, violent and genuinely disturbing on a number of different levels, Silent Joe confirms Jefferson Parker's reputation as one of America's most innovative thriller writers.

He's consistently stretching the envelope with beautifully drawn characters and pulse-raising plotting.

The Hunted

By Alan Jacobson

Coronet st£6.99

Put together an agoraphobic psychologist, her amnesiac husband who has gone missing on a skiing holiday with friends she doesn't know, a villain who manages to surgically remove an electronic bugging device from his own buttock and an FBI director whose daughter is kidnapped under the noses of her security detail, you suddenly realise you're reading a book that stretches the limits of credulity beyond breaking point. When Anthony Scarponi, the psychopathic CIA-trained assassin who just about every law-enforcement agency in America is chasing with about as much disciplined organisation as the Keystone Cops, had his hands around the neck of the wishy-washy heroine Dr Lauren Chamber I was cheering him on.

Pretty pathetic stuff, with a plot containing about as many holes as a Lainey Keogh knitted sweater and a whole lot less interesting.

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