Wednesday 18 October 2017

Comment: Why #AskHerMore is a pointless red carpet trend

Actress Charlize Theron attends the 88th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 28, 2016 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Actress Charlize Theron attends the 88th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 28, 2016 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Tom Hiddleston got into heavyweight issues at the Golden Globes
Kirsty Blake Knox

Kirsty Blake Knox

Finally! After all the other makey-uppy Hollywood awards ceremonies we have reached the big kahuna; The Oscars.

All the shiny happy stars will have practised their gracious loser faces, over 2,000 bottles of Piper-Heidsieck champagne will be popped and Ryan Seacrest's face will loom in front of us like the Northern star.

Thankfully, you won't have to stay up and watch the show on Sunday evening - instead you can gleam the best bits from the 'inter web' the following morning.

Some things will definitely happen.

Trump will definitely get a shout out. Ruth and Consolata will do us proud. Someone will cry.

And all those very angry people on social ­media will implore red carpet presenters to ignore actresses' designer rig-out and ­#AskHerMore.

This has to be one of the most sanctimonious hashtags out there. And Lord knows there is plenty of competition.

Why is asking a woman about her dress so bad? Is it really undermining the feminist cause?

Tom Hiddleston got into heavyweight issues at the Golden Globes
Tom Hiddleston got into heavyweight issues at the Golden Globes

Maybe we just want to know how she ended up in a dress that costs more than a car.

People tend to treat those red carpet reporters with such disdain - like they are all vacuous morons.

And some of them are, but I have been that soldier and it's not an easy gig.

Firstly, you have maybe three minutes max to talk to these people before their publicist whisks them away.

Everything has to be short and snappy.

There simply isn't the time to get into a serious discussion with Emma Stone about the global economic implication of the devaluing of the Chinese Yuan.

And if you were heading into a no-expenses-spared blow-out party would you really want to be asked that? I doubt it.

Second off, let's give the designers and stylist some credit here. This is an industry event - not just for film but for fashion too.

A whole team of people have spent days/ weeks/ months crafting the look together.

Asking people what they are wearing is like asking about the director and gaffers on a movie set.

It bothers me when actresses feign disinterest in their ensemble and mumble that it's the work of "some designer".

They know everything about that dress, the cut, the cost, how long it took to be sewn into it, everything.

Also actors talking about heavyweight issues at a red carpet do isn't always such a hot idea.

Remember Tom Hiddleston speech at the Golden Globes? The toe curling one where he recalled the time he'd met doctors in war-torn Sudan who had binge-watched The Night Manager during a bomb shelling?

"The idea that we could provide some relief and entertainment for people… made me immensely proud."

He's a modest man is Hiddleston.

In truth, 99pc of actors sound like that when discussing charity/ humanitarian work or anything that is "close to their heart". It's a little self congratulatory.

Of course there is the argument that men aren't asked the same questions.

That's true but I don't think that's out of malice.

It's more to do with the fact that well, a tux isn't the same conversation starter a sequinned Chanel dress is.

As Chris Rock noted last year. "Men all wear the same thing... If George Clooney wore a lime green tux and a swan coming out of his ass, someone would ask: 'What you wearing George?'"

Plus half the fun of the red carpet is it's airy ridiculousness - so let's keep it that way. Please.

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