Wednesday 28 September 2016

Amanda Brunker: 'Airbrushing is not the enemy, I think everyone should do it'

Amanda Brunker

Published 03/12/2015 | 08:29

Amanda Brunker before and after airbrushing. Picture courtesy of Nadia Power.
Amanda Brunker before and after airbrushing. Picture courtesy of Nadia Power.
Amanda Brunker before and after airbrushing. Picture courtesy of Nadia Power.
Amanda Brunker
Amanda Brunker at her debs. She hated the picture so much afterwards she drew over her face with a pen.

Airbrushing is not the enemy.

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All the Kardashians are at it. Queen Bey has been accused of doing it. Even Kate Moss - recent 'real life' photos of her show that she's also culpable of encouraging a little Photoshop.

Recently, lads mag favourite Kelly Brook received a tsunami of hate from Instagram trolls for admitting to airbrushing some of her pictures online. "It’s no different to wearing a push-up bra, squeezing into spanx or having botox," she explained. And I have to agree with her.

As far as I’m concerned, there’s nothing wrong with tweaking an image to remove a few blemishes or the odd tummy fold to make it look beautiful. Perfection is subjective after all.

Amanda Brunker before and after airbrushing. Picture courtesy of Nadia Power.
Amanda Brunker before and after airbrushing. Picture courtesy of Nadia Power.

But distorting it to a freakishly disturbing skeletal size and passing it off as fashion, well that I do have a problem with.

British Vogue editor Alexandra Schulman has gone on the record to say she doesn’t believe size zero models create eating disorders. For that, I think she is totally wrong. Fashion's ongoing obsession with the super skinny model damages people’s mental and physical health. And occasionally sticking an obese size 22 model on a catwalk (usually to drum up positive publicity) isn't going to counteract that.

But airbrushing does have its place. It could even be considered a new form of artistry.

Like modern day portrait painters, photographers now have the power to manipulate images in the vein of great artists such as Leonardo da Vinci. Did the Mona Lisa look just as she did in the painting or did he enhance her beguiling eyes, skin or lips? I’m sure he did. So why can’t photographers today do the same?

Amanda Brunker
Amanda Brunker

I honestly wish airbrushing had been around in my youth. It breaks my heart thinking of all the pictures I side-stepped as a teenager because of gruesome cold-sores or spotty foreheads.

For many years, I was plagued with the usual teenage outbreaks so I totally avoided photographs. And for that reason, years of family memories have been erased all because I wouldn’t get into a picture. Even worse, in some cases, after the photos were developed, I’d scribble out my face with pen out of pure hatred.

Now people don’t have to despise themselves in pictures, they can simply add a sepia tone to wash out a dodgy complexion or whiten their eyes to forget a hangover. That’s not false representation, it’s just being kind to yourself. And if we can’t be a generous to ourselves, then where’s the fun?

I’m not saying we need to airbrush ourselves until we look like someone else and yes, there will always be the people who take it to the extreme. But surely if we all use airbrushing responsibly and are honest about it, we can all live happily ever after.

Amanda Brunker at her debs. She hated the picture so much afterwards she drew over her face with a pen.
Amanda Brunker at her debs. She hated the picture so much afterwards she drew over her face with a pen.

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