Sunday 25 September 2016

Is this the best age to get married if you don't want a divorce?

Published 22/07/2015 | 12:29

Young couple dancing during wedding reception in domestic garden
Young couple dancing during wedding reception in domestic garden
Kate Middleton with Prince William were both 28 when they wed
Bride and groom in bright clothes on the bench

If you're looking to get married but worried about timing, rest up because science has done the work for you.

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New research suggests couples should get married between the ages of 28 to 32 for the lowest divorce rate (within the first five years).

Nick Wolfinger, sociologist at the University of Utah said couples between these ages have the least likely chance of parting ways, a theory in stark contrast to the long believed notion that marrying later in life equals more security and happiness.

"The odds of divorce decline as you age from your teenage years through your late twenties and early thirties," he said of the dayd taken between 2006 to 2010 and 2011 to 2013.

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"Thereafter, the chances of divorce go up again as you move into your late thirties and early forties.” For each year after about 32, the chance of divorce goes up about 5% says the study."

Kate Middleton with Prince William were both 28 when they wed
Kate Middleton with Prince William were both 28 when they wed

Some of the reasons for this may be that people are mature enough to understand who they are without being so set in their ways, fights ensue over which way the tea towels are folded.

They are also likely more financially independent, while also possibly having a salary capable of supporting someone else.

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"The kinds of people who wait till their thirties to get married may be the kinds of people who aren’t predisposed toward doing well in their marriages," he said. 

"People who marry later face a pool of potential spouses that has been winnowed down to exclude the individuals most predisposed to succeed at matrimony.”

But this study is just the latest in a long line of investigations into when, if at all, marrying is best.

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