Monday 25 September 2017

Why I always fake it

Deirdre Reynolds

Deirdre Reynolds

Every girl knows sometimes you just have to fake it.

For me, nowhere is this more noticeable than my wardrobe.

From I-can't-believe-it's-not-Birkin handbags to Who?-boutin shoes, if it's a knockoff, it's probably in there somewhere.

So when it comes to this season's hottest trend for fur, there's no question but that it would be ho-ho-faux.

Just like Hannah, I turned veggie four years ago. When people find out you don't eat meat, the first thing they usually ask is: 'Why?'

Most assume you're some kind of tofu-munching animal rights terrorist. Never mind that it's healthier, cheaper and creates less mess in the kitchen.

Similarly, there's more than one obvious reason not to wear fur. Plenty of my friends do and I don't pelt them with red paint whenever they turn up in their granny's mink coat.

I just don't see the need to rock the cavewoman look.

Ireland is already an embarrassment when it comes to animal cruelty.

You don't have to watch Love/Hate for scenes of barbarity: a horse reportedly burned alive in Tallaght and a puppy blown apart in Athlone last week.

Clichéd, yes, but I wouldn't want my pet dogs Homer or Holly gassed, strangled or electrocuted for fashion, and wouldn't feel too stylish knowing some other critter had been either.

Taking a lower moral ground, fake fur is a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

Fur fans always wheel out that old chestnut about how "real fur can claim far greater green credentials than fake". What they never concede is that fake fur, now virtually indistinguishable from real fur, can last just as long because it's more bug-resistant and weather-proof.

Animal-free fur has been around since 1929, and there are pieces in my wardrobe more than a decade old. Okay, so my latest purchase, this €89 faux fur gilet from Marks & Spencer, is unlikely to be handed down from generation to generation.

But it's not about to end up in landfill after a few weeks either.

Funnily enough, you never hear the fur brigade say that we should all be dripping in real diamonds rather than diamanté.

Now there's a campaign I could really get behind.

In the meantime, you can still look foxy without fur.

Irish Independent

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