Friday 31 October 2014

Tom Ford on dressing for the red carpet

Published 28/02/2014 | 10:37

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 07:  Model Chanel Iman (L) and designer Tom Ford attend the "Schiaparelli And Prada: Impossible Conversations" Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 7, 2012 in New York City.  (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images)
Model Chanel Iman (L) and designer Tom Ford

Tom Ford says the red carpet is a “bubble of 1950s Barbie clothes”.

The designer has been open about how uninspiring he finds dressing stars for major events. He will usually only dress one woman per red carpet – whether that’s the Oscars or the Golden Globes. That’s because it is not a very creative process for him.

“What's worn on the red carpet has nothing to do with what's going on in contemporary fashion. It's really a kind of bubble of 1950s Barbie clothes that's quite different than what real people are really wearing,” he told talk show host Jimmy Kimmel.

When creating his collections, Tom sees himself as a “voice for contemporary culture”. That changes when he works with actresses for something like the Academy Awards, as then it becomes all about the look they want to convey. The star will always have an idea of how they want to be perceived, which Tom claims stops the designer being creative.

One thing he was more excited about was the track Jay Z made in his honour, which is named after him.

“I know him and he emailed me saying, 'I’m writing a song called Tom Ford,' and I didn’t know what to expect but I trust him, he’s a great guy. Then I heard the song. I had to go on rap translator to translate it to sort of understand what it meant,” he laughed. “But the message is really quite positive. He doesn't do drugs; he wears Tom Ford - that's how he gets his high. So who doesn't like that?”

Jay Z has become known for wearing a basketball top emblazoned with ‘Tom Ford 61’ on the back. It wasn’t designed by Tom, who got his own back by parading a sequinned-covered version of the piece down his Fall/Winter 14 catwalk at London Fashion Week earlier this month.

“I knocked off the knock off. You have the $65 one and the $6,500 one,” he laughed.

Tom also touched on the fashion world in general, explaining he is proud to be a commercial designer who creates pieces people can actually wear. However, he still respects those who approach fashion as art.

“I always try to really send real things down the runway, that I believe mean something. Not everyone does. Different people approach the business in different ways,” he said.

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