Friday 9 December 2016

There's a pretty powerful reason why Hillary Clinton wore purple during her concession speech

Published 10/11/2016 | 13:55

US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a concession speech after being defeated by Republican President-elect Donald Trump, as former President Bill Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine(R) look on in New York
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a concession speech after being defeated by Republican President-elect Donald Trump, as former President Bill Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine(R) look on in New York
Hillary Clinton departs with her husband, former U.S. President Bill Clinton, after addressing her staff and supporters about the results of the U.S. election at a hotel in the Manhattan borough of New York
Hillary and Bill Clinton arrive to the New Yorker Hotel where she was to address supporters on November 9, 2016 in New York City. The former Democratic Presidential nominee conceded defeat to president-elect Donald Trump earlier in the morning. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton concedes the presidential election as (L-R) Chelsea Clinton, Bill Clinton, Tim Kaine and Anne Holton listen at the New Yorker Hotel on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a concession speech after being defeated by Republican presidential-elect Donald Trump, in New York
Hillary Clinton, accompanied by her husband former U.S. President Bill Clinton (L) and running mate Senator Tim Kaine, addresses her staff and supporters about the results of the U.S. election at a hotel in New York, November 9, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

It's the small things.

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Hillary Clinton has been praised for her apt ensemble while delivering her concession speech in New York on Wednesday The former Democratic Presidential candidate wore one of her signature pantsuits, choosing a purple top with the same colour detail on her blazer, a move many have praised for its relevance - other than flattering her skintone.

In July, while accepting her party nomination at the DNC, she wore white - the colour of the Suffragettes (which incoming First Lady Melania Trump wore during her husband President-elect Donald Trump's acceptance speech) - so she knows the political symbolism hidden in her fashion choices.

But what does it mean? There are a few options.

US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a concession speech after being defeated by Republican presidential-elect Donald Trump, in New York
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a concession speech after being defeated by Republican presidential-elect Donald Trump, in New York

Purple could be a nod to red + blue, encouraging unity among the political parties, hinting at the purple associated with swing states and she emphasised the need for harmony after her defeat.

"Our campaign was never about one person or even one election. It was about the country we love and about building an America that's hopeful, inclusive and bighearted," she said.

"We have seen that our nation is more deeply divided than we thought, but I still believe in America, and I always will.

"And if you do, then we must accept this result and then look to the future. Donald Trump is going to be our president. We owe him an open mind and the chance to lead."

Purple also features on the suffragette flag (which also features white and gold. The National Woman's Party describes it as "the colour of loyalty, constancy to purpose, unswerving steadfastness to a cause."

"Nothing has made me prouder than to be your champion," she said during her speech.

It is also the colour of anti-bullying campaigns among the LGBT community, a cause which she championed throughout her campaign.

Purple is also used heavily by Methodists, which she has been practicing since she was a child and often spoke highly of during her time in public office.

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