Tuesday 25 April 2017

Roland Mouret autumn/winter 2011 at Paris Fashion Week

Creations from the new Roland Mouret collection. Photo: Getty Images
Creations from the new Roland Mouret collection. Photo: Getty Images

Hilary Alexander

Hot on the heels of opening his new London headquarters, Roland Mouret delivers an immaculate collection, says Hilary Alexander.

Inspired by early pictures of the young Lady Diana Spencer, in a filmy, printed skirt, shirt, and little knitted vest that could have been borrowed from her brother, Roland Mouret invested his autumn/winter 2011 collection with a soft, floaty, flowing ambience, "like perfume on a breeze."

Fresh from the opening, during London Fashion Week, of his magnificent new, six-storey headquarters and flagship store, in a Grade one listed mansion, in Mayfair, Mouret was in a confident mood, at the Paris prêt-à-porter season this morning.

Roland Mouret autumn/winter 2011 collection

The looser line was created with clever tucks and folds, open pleats and the ingenious draping which has been a feature of Mouret's work since he first showed at London Fashion Week, in 1998.

And the gentleness of his approach was underscored by a soft colour palette of lilac, duck-egg blue, buttermilk, taupe, grey and beige, together with his customary black, navy, mustard and khaki, and occasional shots of kelly-green, parma-violet, ruby, and cobalt.



Mouret also introduced fur, in the form of throw-on vests, little boleros, and draped jackets, in stripes of lilac, black, and mustard, which co-ordinated with the prints and jacquard knitwear.



Hemlines were generally below the knee, but a shorter mini played to the leggy brigade.



The incisive quality of Mouret's cut drew the eye in immaculate, seamed, zippered jackets with a small peplum, or else a draped, face-framing collar; in bomber-jackets and military-look wool trench-coats, which came with wide-leg tweed trousers; and in parachute silk dresses, both short and long, with fluttering side-panels with the merest suggestion of transparency, which related directly to Mouret's initial reference point.



But what would a collection by the inventor of the famous "Galaxy" dress be without something which cleaved more to the body? Mouret did not disappoint on that front either.

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