Fashion

Thursday 21 August 2014

Marc Jacobs to makeover 'polluted' range of handbags

Published 07/02/2014 | 09:34

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LONDON, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 02:  Marc Jacobs attends the British Fashion Awards 2013 at London Coliseum on December 2, 2013 in London, England.  (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)
Marc Jacobs
One of Marc Jacobs' best-selling handbags

The fashion designer has two eponymous luxury labels to his name, Marc Jacobs and Marc by Marc Jacobs. He also previously worked as creative director at Louis Vuitton, a post which he departed from last year.

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Speaking to W magazine in a candid interview about the future of his Marc Jacobs business, the 50-year-old star shared his thoughts on how to move it forward. He also admitted the downside of his attempt to try and boost his handbag and shoe line.

"I was talking to [my therapist] about how there's all this change in the air, how I have all these ideas and how to go forward, but how on some level I don't want to change anything. You see, I hate change. Well, I love it in a comfortable/uncomfortable sort of way. I'm thinking about everything," he explained to W magazine.

"I was letting the design team do the [handbags], and, unfortunately, without my involvement, you get a lot of merchandisers telling the team what to do. It got very polluted and diluted and lost its identity, and I think that's the same with the shoes. Not to blame anybody, but things slipped, and the only one who can change that is me."

Another idea Marc is contemplating is to show his new collections as part of Paris Fashion Week instead of New York in the future. He believes the French capital would be a great environment for it.

"There's always been this impression that I've been in Paris only to do Vuitton, and New York for Marc Jacobs, but that's never been the case," he insisted. "I have Marc Jacobs offices in Paris and, if anything, maybe they need to get bigger. You know, I'm not opposed to someday showing Marc Jacobs in Paris. It's part of what I thought might be a nice way to distinguish between the two lines."

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