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Thursday 8 December 2016

Irish history takes pride of place in luxury scarf range

Published 26/10/2015 | 02:30

Keira and Dairine Kennedy model their KDK scarves inspired by a photograph they took beside Dublin’s Four Courts. Photo: Steve Humphreys
Keira and Dairine Kennedy model their KDK scarves inspired by a photograph they took beside Dublin’s Four Courts. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Keira and Dairine Kennedy have the luxury cashmere scarf market all wrapped up.

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This week, the sisters behind the Irish lifestyle brand, KDK, make their first delivery to the Avoca stores after securing a sizeable order for their cashmere-blend scarves.

"We are in business four years and I feel like we have really hit our rhythm now," said Keira.

"Brown Thomas have our very premium line of 100pc cashmere and silk scarves that cost €235 and €260 and now Avoca are taking our new cashmere, wool and silk mix which at €120, is a lower price range but they are still high quality, investment pieces."

It's been a busy few years for the sisters who both have rugby connections true and blue; Dairine is married to Leo Cullen, coach of Leinster Rugby, and Keira worked at the club as commercial manager.

Images around Ireland and historic architecture in Dublin city such as the GPO and the Four Courts inspired their latest collection and the prints purposely coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising and the other images used throughout the collection.

Key Irish landmarks celebrate the joining of old and new Ireland, explains Dairine. They include O'Connell Street, the Spire, Connemara clouds, Belfast trees, and dolmens in Co Clare, which she sketched during maternity leave from Google after giving birth to her son last year.

Keira has a young daughter and baby son and the sisters move seamlessly between the worlds of business and art. They both have first-class Masters from Smurfit Business School and inherited a love of art from their grandfather, John Lynch, who was a prolific painter.

A keen photographer, Keira takes the digital images used in their abstract print designs, such as the one on their scarves pictured above which captures the Father Mathew Bridge and a scene beside Dublin's Four Courts.

Irish Independent

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