Thursday 8 December 2016

'Unrecognisable Kylie Jenner is no role model for our teens' - Pippa O'Connor

Sean O'Grady

Published 15/10/2016 | 11:47

Pippa O'Connor. Photo: Leon Farrell
Pippa O'Connor. Photo: Leon Farrell
Kylie Jenner
Kylie Jenner by the pool at Coachella. PIC: Kylie Jenner Instagram

Pippa O'Connor has hit out at reality TV star Kylie Jenner, saying she is not a good role model for teenage girls and is "unrecognisable" due to cosmetic surgery.

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The beauty blogger has legions of young followers, thanks to the success of her self-titled website, but she does not think the Keeping Up With The Kardashians star is someone young people should emulate.

Kylie (19) has been criticised for cosmetically enhancing her appearance despite her young age, after admitting to getting lip fillers.

"I don't agree with all of that, especially for teenagers," said O'Connor.

Kylie Jenner
Kylie Jenner

Speaking on 2fm's The Nicky Byrne Show, the mum-of-two said she respected the Kardashian family for building their business, but said Jenner is "unrecognisable" from her younger days.

"I suppose you have to admire their work ethic. Kris Jenner is the brains behind everything. I admire that and I find it fascinating," she said.

"But I do not like the pressure it's putting on young girls like Kylie Jenner. Her face is just unrecognisable."

O'Connor has just published her first book, Pippa: Simple Tips To Live Beautifully.

Kylie Jenner by the pool at Coachella. PIC: Kylie Jenner Instagram
Kylie Jenner by the pool at Coachella. PIC: Kylie Jenner Instagram

Although she is proud of how it turned out, the model said if she had known how hard writing would be when she signed the publishing deal, she might not have done it.

"One of the Penguin team contacted me and said they would love to meet me to discuss the possibility of writing a book. I didn't at all think I'd be capable," she said.

"If you had told me how difficult it was going to be, I probably would have thought twice."

"It was hard. I know it's not a novel, but getting all that information into a book in a short space of time was tough going."

O'Connor sat at her desk for hours on end to make sure she met her deadline.

"When it got to the end and I had maybe three weeks left, I was doing five, six days a week," she said.

"I was doing it first thing in the morning until four or five in the evening."

Herald

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