Tuesday 6 December 2016

Prince Harry: 'I'll spend the rest of my life filling the void that my mother's death left'

Published 06/05/2016 | 09:15

Prince Harry speaks as he attends the official media launch for Invictus Games Toronto 2017, at the Concert Hall in the Royal York Hotel, Toronto. Photo: Peter Byrne/PA Wire
Prince Harry speaks as he attends the official media launch for Invictus Games Toronto 2017, at the Concert Hall in the Royal York Hotel, Toronto. Photo: Peter Byrne/PA Wire
Prince Harry
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U.S. President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama pose with Kate, William and Harry at Kensington Palace. Reuters/Kevin Lamarque
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Prince Harry takes a closer look at a robotic mask
Prince Harry

Britain's Prince Harry has spoken of the "gaping hole" left in his life following the death of his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales.

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The Prince, who is hosting the Invictus Games in Orlando, Florida, said he was trying to "fill that void as much as possible" with his charity work and hoped it would make his mother "incredibly proud".

In an interview with US magazine People, Harry also discussed flashbacks he had suffered since serving in Afghanistan and how he had thought about having children.

"All I want to do is make my mother incredibly proud," he said. "That's all I've ever wanted to do. When she died, there was a gaping hole, not just for us but also for a huge amount of people across the world.

"I will have to, in a good way, spend the rest of my life trying to fill that void as much as possible. And so will William.

"I know I've got a lot of my mother in me. I am doing a lot of things that she would probably do."

Harry, 31, said he had suffered flashbacks following his time as a helicopter pilot on his second tour of Afghanistan in 2012/13.

"Most of the flashbacks I've had have not been that brutal," he told People. "I haven't seen what other guys have seen. There's all sorts of things that can happen through your life, that if you don't deal with it, you don't talk about it, then it can end up affecting you in later life."

Harry also told the magazine he had experienced the urge to have children, especially during foreign tours.

He said: "There have been moments through life, especially when we do a tour abroad, when I think, 'I'd love to have kids now' ... and then there are other times when I bury my head in the sand going, 'All right, don't need kids!' There's no rush."

The full interview in People magazine is out on Friday.

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