Friday 2 December 2016

Prince Charles says granddaughter Princess Charlotte is already sleeping through the night

Published 11/06/2015 | 08:20

Photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge of Prince George and Princess Charlotte. The photograph was taken by the Duchess in mid-May at Anmer Hall in Norfolk.
Photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge of Prince George and Princess Charlotte. The photograph was taken by the Duchess in mid-May at Anmer Hall in Norfolk.
Photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge of Prince George and Princess Charlotte. The photograph was taken by the Duchess in mid-May at Anmer Hall in Norfolk.
Princess Charlotte was born in the Lindo Wing of St Mary's Hospital in London
Photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge of Prince George and Princess Charlotte. The photograph was taken by the Duchess in mid-May at Anmer Hall in Norfolk
Kate Middleton and Prince William present Princess Charlotte to the world on the steps of the Lindo Wing at St Mary's hospital in London
Undated handout photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge of Prince George and Princess Charlotte. The photograph was taken by the Duchess in mid-May at Anmer Hall in Norfolk.
Prince Charles

Princess Charlotte may only be a few months old but she is already sleeping through the night, the Prince of Wales has revealed.

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Charles chatted about his baby granddaughter, who was born on May 2, when he hosted a Clarence House tea party with the Duchess of Cornwall for pilots and aircrew who fought in the Second World War.

Photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge of Prince George and Princess Charlotte. The photograph was taken by the Duchess in mid-May at Anmer Hall in Norfolk
Photo released by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge of Prince George and Princess Charlotte. The photograph was taken by the Duchess in mid-May at Anmer Hall in Norfolk

The former royal navy helicopter pilot whose sons also became military fliers joked about how the "heads-up" displays found in some aircraft was something best left to the "PlayStation generation".

While Camilla shared a joke with one veteran Spitfire pilot about the benefits of drinking red wine and whisky.

Geoff Bradley was invited along with his wife Veronica as her father Owen Burns, who will be 100 in November, had been a gunner in Bristol Blenheim bombers.

Read more: Following in her mother's footsteps: Princess Charlotte's bodysuit is a fashion hit

He said: "We were talking about grandchildren, he was saying Princess Charlotte does sleep through the night and it was much easier on mum than Prince George."

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have been looking after their daughter at their Norfolk home Anmer Hall since a few days after her birth.

Kate Middleton and Prince William present Princess Charlotte to the world on the steps of the Lindo Wing at St Mary's hospital in London
Kate Middleton and Prince William present Princess Charlotte to the world on the steps of the Lindo Wing at St Mary's hospital in London

They released pictures of the baby princess being cuddled by her brother George at the weekend.

Charles and Camilla sat down to afternoon tea complete with crust-free sandwiches and scones with the veterans and their families.

As the prince chatted to one table he described how helicopters had changed since his time as a Royal Navy helicopter pilot in the 1970s.

Harry, who is leaving the Army later this month after 10 years, flew the sophisticated Apache attack helicopters for a number of years including during his last tour of Afghanistan.

Prince Charles
Prince Charles

Read more: Prince George cradles and kisses Princess Charlotte in first photos released by Kate Middleton and Prince William

Charles described how Apache pilots have "head-up displays" providing non-stop information for the pilot "you see it all the time" and he put his hands to his eyes in the shape of goggles.

Speaking about Harry's ability to use the aircraft's complicated weaponry and instruments, the heir to the throne added: "I take my hat off to my youngest, he seemed to be coping."

Then he joked that the controls were "All right for the PlayStation generation. I used to try playing with my children", and as he spoke he moved his fingers like he was controlling a computer console then laughed.

Telegraph.co.uk

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