Wednesday 28 June 2017

Netflix boss: Some film stars do not want us to make movies

BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE Undated file handout image issued by Netflix of their logo. A thriller about kidnapped children, a drama about the power struggles between the church, state and criminal underworld of Rome and a series about 1920s telephone operators are among the foreign language shows to launch on Netflix this year.
BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE Undated file handout image issued by Netflix of their logo. A thriller about kidnapped children, a drama about the power struggles between the church, state and criminal underworld of Rome and a series about 1920s telephone operators are among the foreign language shows to launch on Netflix this year.

By David Mercer

Reed Hastings said Netflix was aiming to make its own Oscar-winning movies.

The head of Netflix has admitted some movie stars are unhappy with the company’s expansion into the film industry.

Reed Hastings, who co-founded the streaming service, said its plans to create more original movies had faced an “uneven” reaction from showbusiness figures.

It follows Netflix’s string of successful original TV shows including House Of Cards, The Crown and Orange Is The New Black.

“Some talent is excited about it,” Hastings told reporters at Netflix’s headquarters in Los Gatos, California.

“Some talent is willing to work with it if we pay them enough.

“Other talent does not want to be on the cutting edge, say like Kevin Spacey and David Fincher were with Netflix and House Of Cards.”

Hastings confirmed Netflix is still negotiating a deal for Martin Scorsese’s forthcoming gangster film The Irishman starring Robert De Niro and Al Pacino.

The company is aiming for Oscar success with its own original films, he added.

“If we do well for our talent in those shows, the talent is more interested in working with us,” Hastings said.

“It’s something we’ll definitely invest in. Not because it matters that much to consumers, but it helps in the creative ecosystem.”

Hastings insisted Netflix – which is viewed on television screens, laptops or mobile devices – did not want to “kill” cinemas.

“We’re not anti-theatre,” he said. “We just want things to come out at the same time.

“The theatres – at least the big theatres like Regal and AMC – refuse to share with us. They refuse to give options to the customer.

“Our motivation is to see innovation and growth in the movie market. It’s not to kill the theatre. Like many of you, we go to the theatres. We enjoy it.”

Netflix recently hired Scott Stuber, a former vice chairman of worldwide production at Universal Studios, to oversee its burgeoning original film studio.

The streaming service took home its first Oscar this year after White Helmets won best short documentary.

Press Association

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