Saturday 24 June 2017

How Prince William and Kate Middleton's honesty is 'proof of Princess Diana's legacy'

Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and Prince William laugh during a visit and opening of the Centre of Excellence for Hayward Tyler in Luton, England. Picture: REUTERS/Frank Augstein/Pool
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and Prince William laugh during a visit and opening of the Centre of Excellence for Hayward Tyler in Luton, England. Picture: REUTERS/Frank Augstein/Pool
The Duchess of Cambridge (centre) listens in to real calls during a visit to YoungMinds in London, a helpline service run by one of the eight charity partners of their Heads Together mental health campaign. Picture: Arthur Edwards/The Sun/PA Wire
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, during a visit to a helpline service, as part of a Heads Together campaign in London. Picture: REUTERS/Arthur Edwards/Pool
Harry with his big brother William and late mother Princess Diana
Prince Harry salutes as he arrives to attend his first day at nursery school with Charles, Prince of Wales, Diana, Princess of Wales and his brother, Prince William on September 16, 1987 in London, England. (Photo by Anwar Hussein/Getty Images)
Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry arrive to attend the launch of Heads Together Campaign at Olympic Park on May 16, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, smiles during a visit to a helpline service, as part of a Heads Together campaign in London. Picture: REUTERS/Arthur Edwards/Pool
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, smiles during a visit to a helpline service, as part of a Heads Together campaign in London. Picture: REUTERS/Arthur Edwards/Pool
The Princess of Wales with her sons William and Harry on the chair lift during a skiing holiday in Lech, Austria, April 1991. (Photo by Jayne Fincher/Princess Diana Archive/Getty Images)
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, smiles during a visit to a helpline service, as part of a Heads Together campaign in London. Picture: REUTERS/Arthur Edwards/Pool
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, smiles during a visit to a helpline service, as part of a Heads Together campaign in London. Picture: REUTERS/Arthur Edwards/Pool
The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive at Bute Mills in Luton, to tour the facilities of national charity Youthscape. Picture: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire
Caitlin McBride

Caitlin McBride

Prince William's work with mental health charities has been described as "proof of his mother's legacy".

William, alongside his wife Kate Middleton (and brother Prince Harry), have taken on the charge of mental health awareness with the charity Heads Together and the pair have been praised for speaking candidly after two appearances this week.

The young royals are opening up a dialogue new to the royal family, contrary to the clichéd "stiff upper lip" of previous generations, in direct reflection of their late mother Princess Diana.

Royal expert Ingrid Seward, who edits Majesty magazine, told People: "Traditionally, royalty has had a stiff upper lip. But these two – and Prince Harry – are anything but traditional. William has often gone out on a limb.

The Duchess of Cambridge (centre) listens in to real calls during a visit to YoungMinds in London, a helpline service run by one of the eight charity partners of their Heads Together mental health campaign. Picture: Arthur Edwards/The Sun/PA Wire
The Duchess of Cambridge (centre) listens in to real calls during a visit to YoungMinds in London, a helpline service run by one of the eight charity partners of their Heads Together mental health campaign. Picture: Arthur Edwards/The Sun/PA Wire

"He is following Diana – and that is further proof of her legacy."

They "can't promote the idea that people should talk openly without talking openly themselves."

The Duchess told a group of parents in London they worry about their children Prince George (three) and Princess Charlotte (one).

 "I am sure we will face worries. We do face worries, because we've got small young children," she is recorded as saying in a new clip.

Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, smiles during a visit to a helpline service, as part of a Heads Together campaign in London. Picture: REUTERS/Arthur Edwards/Pool
Britain's Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, smiles during a visit to a helpline service, as part of a Heads Together campaign in London. Picture: REUTERS/Arthur Edwards/Pool

The trio have launched an aggressive initiative in raising mental health awareness over the last 12 months, pairing with Heads Together and speaking individually on the topic.

In a rare public speech, Kate expressed her support for the UK's first Child Mental Health Awareness Week, while William said he wouldn't hesitate in seeking help for one of his children Prince George (three) or Princess Charlotte (one).

"In particular, it is a time to reflect on my responsibility to look after not just the physical health of my two children, but to treat their mental needs as just as important a priority," he said in June.

Meanwhile, Harry recently opened up about his regrets at not speaking about his mother Princess Diana's death until he was 28.

Harry with his big brother William and late mother Princess Diana
Harry with his big brother William and late mother Princess Diana

Harry was 12 and his brother William 15 when Diana was killed in a car crash in Paris on August 31 1997.

 "I really regret not ever talking about it. It's OK to suffer, as long as you talk about it," he said last month.

"It's not a weakness. Weakness is having a problem and not recognising it and not solving that problem."

he Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry are spearheading a new campaign called Heads Together in partnership with inspiring charities
he Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry are spearheading a new campaign called Heads Together in partnership with inspiring charities

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